Mornings with Mayesh: July 2018

Mornings with Mayesh

 

During July’s Mornings with Mayesh episode, Yvonne, Dave, and Shelley discuss the world of flowers. See a great selection of flowers that are available now and learn more about peony season. In addition, they answer some great audience questions like: how long can stems be out of water before needing a fresh cut, can you use flowers cut from your garden, tips on designing with dahlias and hydrangea, how far in advance can you start designing for an event, tips on providing green or eco-friendly flowers, favorite vase sources, marketing to find your right client, how to find the best hashtags to use for your floral business, and so much more.

#morningswithmayesh

Here is the podcast replay, video and show notes:

 

 

SHOW NOTES

 

FLOWER QUESTIONS

  • WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE WORLD OF FLOWERS?
    • https://www.mayesh.com/flower-411-july-2018/
    • Shelley: We have some cool Oregon product I pulled. I have black hollyhocks and rudbeckia etc..
    • Dave: I have some cool bleached white umbrella fern from Japan, giant astilbe on steroids from Holland, tree of heaven from California & nigella pods from California.
  • From Muffy: With Wedding season in full swing, can you let us know the availability on Peonies as it seems all the brides want them in their bouquets. Since the local markets here are now finished, we all need an alternative supplier or list of suppliers for this flower.
    • Dave: We are so lucky to have peonies almost all year round these days. Unfortunately, they do sporadically gap in availability as we transition from the geography where they are producing. We expect to get our next shipment from Alaska & it should hit sometime in the next few weeks and last into September. Peonies are typically cut in mass harvests and can be cold-stored for several weeks without compromising their integrity. This means the Alaska season can extend several more weeks into October. There is usually a short gap until we see production from our Chilean and New Zealand growers sometime in early November. Between that crop and some Dutch production, these usually carry us through until Israel hits in February. It’s always a good idea to have a backup flower in mind when your event hits on a seasonal cusp. Most peonies are field or greenhouse grown and variations in seasonal weather can change the expected cut date by weeks.

 

FLOWER CARE

  • From Jen & Jesse: How long can a stem stay out of water before you should really give it a fresh cut again?
    • Dave: I would re-cut the stems every time they are removed from the water for more than a few minutes. Most flower food manufacturers directions state to recut the stems every other day before inserting them back into your freshly prepared floral food hydrating solution. By re-cutting them you are removing the part of the stem that holds air bubbles & bacteria that can clog stems, prevent proper water uptake and shorten the life of your flowers.
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    • Shelley: correct Dave, a good way to tell if they need to be re-cut when you are designing with them for long periods of time if they are out of water is to check the end of the cut stem. If it’s starting to discolor or looks dry give it a fresh cut. If they still have water clinging to them they will usually be ok. Flowers should be re-cut after 2-10 minutes but can stay out of water for up to 2 hours. When in doubt always recut! it’s worth the extra effort and few minutes of your time.
  • From Kirsten: talk about how to handle different kinds of flowers cut this time of the year from our own gardens and how they hold up. hydrangeas are funky from the garden, they are dead in 24 hours. other flowers? tips?
    • Dave: When you are foraging from your garden it is a good idea to vase test all of your desired cuttings prior to using them in events. If they’re not at your cut flower wholesaler it’s for a reason. The varieties we sell have been selected or specifically bred to handle the stresses of cutting, shipping, and handling. Some garden flowers may lack the resilience needed for the rigors of cut flower design. Quick example, South American hydrangea growers have crossbred our more sensitive deciduous North American varieties with an evergreen variety native to tropical regions. This has created some very hardy hydrangea varieties that travel well and have a hugely increased vase life.
  • From Lynn – I love using Dahlias in our florals but seem to have various degrees of success. Hints???
    • Dave: We are in the height of dahlia season now and they are a real treat! They are a slightly sensitive flower so proper hydration in a floral food intended for bulb flowers is crucial. Keep them happy by refreshing their floral solution every other day and in a proper floral cooler at around 36 degrees F before and after design. By pampering them upon receiving they should firm up and be able to handle the stresses of design and ceremony. These are great wedding & event flowers but I would not recommend them for a weekly installation, 5 days is a good life expectancy for this flower.
    • Shelley: I especially prefer ball dahlias they seem to hold up the best.
  • From Patricia: My question is your suggestion for bouquets with hydrangea, particularly when they want the bouquets early for photos.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

  • From Brianna: How many days in advance do you start styling?
    • Shelley: Styling or designing? You can begin prep work on your wedding on Monday prior.
      You can process hardier flowers like roses, get containers ready, inventory everything.. etc.
      You can begin designing some of the centerpieces and cocktails or smaller arrangements on Wed, Personals I usually will do the day before or the morning of if time allows. Large install pieces can be prepped ahead of time and then installed and completed on site. It depends on your level of work and refrigeration you have. How much workspace you have and additional staff. Most small to moderate weddings can be completed in 2 days, larger weddings require more time and work and a bigger staff.
  • From Kirsten: talk about green (environmentally) weddings and how to use flowers thoughtfully – I have a bride who wants this
    • Shelley: this is a topic dear to my heart. I used to own an environmentally friendly flower shop here in CA. In South American product look for Veriflora certified product if possible or the rainforest alliance seal. Also, try to only buy American grown or locally grown product if you can. This is going to limit some of your options of product but you can do lovely wildflower inspired looks with locally grown flowers and garden roses. You need to convey these types of requests to your sales rep here. We, as a company, have worked very hard to offer a robust variety and selection from California, Oregon, and Washington. The use of plants and succulents in your designs is also another way to have a reusable product for the bride after the wedding. She can plant or give away these to guests. Using drieds is also very environmentally friendly. Drying your excess flowers and then using them in designs which is very on trend right now, is a perfect way to keep them from going into the garbage at the end of the day. I sold tons of dried flowers that I preserved myself at my shop and most florists would have thrown all of those away.
      Limit the use of floral foam if at all possible. Try to avoid using containers that require foam.
      Offer to create a program or find a program that will pick up and donate the leftover wedding flowers and deliver them to nursing homes, hospitals etc..
      Upcycle containers, jars and other vessels start a vase exchange program. Have the bride’s family donate containers that are sentimental of heirloom instead of buying more glass from China, or import containers. Or rent your containers so that they may be repeatedly used.
      Dave: When you purchase flowers from us you already are involved! Mayesh buys farm direct and has aligned with 100’s of growers all over the world that are committed to sustainability. This encompasses all aspects from proper land and water use, crop rotation and soil preservation, wildlife and habitat protection around their farms, safe and nontoxic working and living environment for workers, proper handling and disposal of chemicals and the list goes on.

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

  • From Brianna: What are your favorite go-to places for buying vases?
    • Shelley: I am a fan of non-conventional and or thrifted or vintage pieces that already exist and can be re-purposed or re-used. If you have to buy new, Accent Decor is our favorite around here.. I also hit up places like Homegoods, Tuesday Morning and of course if you have the budget Pottery Barn has some of the best modern/organic pieces.I also love Park Hill designs they supply Pottery Barn too. You will have to request a catalog. I tend to look more eclectic pieces and not too matchy but if you do need to stay more budget-friendly and coordinated I would go with your local floral supply wholesaler.
  • From Rebecca: Also, I’d like to learn more about your Las Vegas location (I live in Henderson though am from LA) Do you ever host events there? I’d like to come by the space to see the pretty flowers either way.
    • Yvonne: Las Vegas is a great branch and each year we host Art in Full Bloom. The event showcases art and flowers inspired by the art to raise money for charity. That typically happens in the fall so be sure to check it out. You can visit our blog to see pictures and information from past events. If you want to visit a branch and talk to someone on the team, please feel free to connect with them to set up a time. People do drop in, but I don’t recommend doing that for your first time as there are days & times that can be very crazy.
      Post link: https://www.mayesh.com/?s=art+in+full+bloom
      Link: https://www.mayesh.com/contact-us/locations/

 

MARKETING NEWS

  • From a retail flower shop: As a small independent florist who does not wish to take on the expense of rentals/set up/break down/per diem staff, etc. How do we market ourselves as a boutique wedding florist, doing smaller, more intimate weddings that focus on flowers and greenery more than draping fabrics and elaborate installations?
    • Yvonne: Ensure that your branding and marketing reflects the clients you want to attract and the type of work that you like to do – everything from your print, website, and social media. I visited the website and I noticed that you do not have a wedding section. So that is one thing that I would do immediately. You can add a landing page that talks about your designers, design philosophy, and wedding & event services/design, but most importantly has a form for potential clients to fill out to enter your “sales funnel”. Be sure to also include a portfolio showcasing your designs. Just be sure that all images reflect the type of work that you want to attract. I always recommend blogging for 2 reasons – SEO and having a central hub for your content. Even if you start by blogging 2 times per month, that is better than nothing. You can talk about local events and weddings, area trends, other local happenings & events, etc. This will help people find you and give you somewhere to point people to when you use social media. Once you’ve updated your website, but sure to also include content in your social media posts. I see that you have focused on the retail side of your business, so now you just need to mix in the other piece. I’m going to talk about hashtags next and that will be helpful to your social media marketing. Another step I would take would be to network with others in your community in the event industry. Agan, focus on cultivating relationships and partnerships with individuals and businesses whose ideal client is similar to yours. So I think these steps will get you started in your desired direction. Good luck!
  • From Roxanne: How do you find the trending hashtags for floral designers?
    Before I answer, does anyone watching want to share some of their favorite hashtags to utilize for their posts?

    • Yvonne: In general, top trending hashtags are great and if you have a post that fits perfectly with one, then great – be sure to include it. But as Roxanne, suggests, you want to use specific hashtags related to your business and then I would take it one step further and be sure to use hashtags related to your business and to your geographic area. The closed thing to a list would be to look at the hashtag list when you begin to start typing in a hashtag in IG’s search bar – Instagram will show you related/similar hashtags and how often they have been used.
      The best way to start creating a list of go-to hashtags is to think of specific topics. For example, if you are posting a wedding bouquet, you can use #bridalbouquet, #weddingbouquet, #weddingflowers, etc, but then you may want to add your target city in the mix #charlestonflorist #charlestonweddingflorist, #charlestonweddings, etc. The next thing I would do, it creates a list of hashtags that other people and competitors are using. Take a look at area influencers and maybe some of your top followers. Also, once you find some hashtags that you like, take a look at the feed and see what other hashtags are being used to get some ideas.
    • Here’s a great article from HubSpot about Instagram hashtags: https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/instagram-hashtags

If you think of new questions for our next show, you can post them in the comments here or use the contact form to send them to Yvonne.

Be sure to mark your calendar for August 14th at 10 am EST for the next Mornings with Mayesh – see you soon!

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