Archive For The “Product Info” Category

Flower 411: March 2019

 

Spring is right around the corner, and with it, great spring flowers become available again! Keep reading to check out what beautiful blooms are available this month!

 

Just Starting

 

Berzelia Local

Cherry Blossom

Eriostemon buds flowering

Euphorbia Wolfnii

Jasmine flowering

Scilla Peruvian

Tulip Parrot Black

 

 

Available

 

Alstroemeria – import

Amaranthus Hanging – green – local (short tails)

Amaryllis – import

Anemone – local

Anthurium – import

Artichokes – baby – red & green limited

Artichokes large – red

Ascelpias Pods

Astilbe White – import

Astrantia – import

Aster Matsumoto

Aussie Pine

Bay leaf

Begonia Leaves – import – only advance notice

Bells – import

Bells local – Winter Bells – gaps between blooms

Bleached Dried Flowers – assorted – import

Blossom – white

Bouvardia – import
Calla – large

Calla – mini

Camellia

Carnations

Chamomile

Chocolate lace

Clematis – Dutch only – no white

Cotton

Coxcomb – import

Cornflower – blue, choco, pink

Craspedia

Cymbidium

Cymbidium – mini

Dahlias – basic colors: burgundy, café, orange, pink, red, white

Daisy Killian – white

Dawn Viburnum Blooming branch

Delphinium Belladonna – dark blue & light blue

Delphinium Hybrid tall – import

Dendrobium

Dianthus Green – import & local

Dianthus Gypsy (burgundy limited)

Dusty Miller

Echeveria

Eriostemon- flowering

Eryngium – import

Euc Pods – silver bells

Euphorbia flowering – Dutch

Freesia – local & import

Garden Roses

Gardenias

Genestra – local & import

Geranium – chocolate & peppermint

Gerbera – assorted

Gloriosa – short – import

Gloriosa – XXL – Japan – $$$

Grass Bunny Tail (sub Canary Grass)

Green Mist

Hellebores – local & import

Hyacinth – import

Hydrangea – import

Hypericum

Iris – dark blue

Ivy

Jasmine Vine – flowering

Kale – frilled – white & purple

Kale – large

Kale – Mini

Kangaroo Paw – import

Kiwi Vine

Larkspur

Lavender – English or French

Leucadendron green, safari sunset, jester, goblet, goldstrike, salignum

Leucospermum – orange, yellow, red, novelty

Lily Asiatic

Lily LA Hybrid

Lily Oriental

Lisianthus – import

Limonium – import

Magnolia tulip budded branches

Maidenhair fern

Mokara

Muscari – import

Nerine – import

Olive branches

Orlaya

Oncidium

Pampas grass – dried only

Peony – import

Phalaenopsis

Phlox – import

Pieris Buds

Plumosa fern – painted

Poppy Icelandic

Poppy Boom Boom

Poppy Big Boy

Protea King – pink only

Protea Pin Cushion

Protea Pink Ice

Protea Pink Mink

Queen Anne’s Lace – chocolate & white

Ranunculus – local

Ranunculus butterfly – local & Japan

Roses

Rosemary

Safari Sunset

Sage green

Scabiosa – import

Scabiosa pods – Dutch only

Scented geranium

Smilax Bags (CA)

Smilax Southern

Solidago

Spirea – Japan

Spray Roses

Spring Bouquet Viburnum

Snapdragons

Star of Beth – import

Statice – seafoam & sinuata

Stock

Succulents

Sunflowers – dark center & red tint – sunbeam & mahogany not available

Sunflower – mini

Sweet Pea – Japan

Sumac w/ cones

Tinted foliages

Trachelium – import

Tropical flowers – ask

Tulips – single

Tulips – double

Tulips – French

Tulips – frilled

Tulips – parrot

Tweedia – import

Vanda

Veronica – import only

Viburnum Tinus – import only

Victorian Birch

Waxflower – local

 

 

Limited

 

Alchemilla mollis

Artichoke – green – large

Banksia – very limited

Camellia – Oregon

Chocolate cosmos – Japan only

Delphinium Hybrid short – local – limited due to weather

Heather White – limited

Nigella – blue flower only

Poppy Pods

Protea – white

Protea Red Baron

Sterling Range – very limited

Thyme

Viburnum Berries – limited

 

 

Finished/ Not Available

 

Acacia foliage – purple feather

Agapanthus – Dutch

Agonis

Amaranthus – upright all colors

Aussie Bells – lavender only

Blackberry

Boronia

Calycina

Celosia feather – local

Chocolate Cosmos – local

Cirsium Thistle – light pink

Delph Bella – white

Euc pods – Silver Bells

Explosion Grass

Festival bush – import

Gladiola – green

Gomphrena

Grapevine fresh

Heather Pink

Limonium Emile

Lunaria

Marigolds

Millet

Paperwhites – local

Pepperberry – hanging & upright

Plum foliage

Pomegranates

Privet berry

Raspberry

Rain Tree pods

Rice Flower

Rose Hips

Stephanotis

Stephanotis vines

Strawflower

Talloberry

Yarrow

 

 

 

Flower 411: February 2019

 

 

New month, new flowers! Check out what new products are available this month (including local anemones!), just in time for Valentine’s Day.

 

 

Just Starting

 

Paper Whites – local

Ranunculus – Japan – $$$

Ranunculus – Italy

 

 

Available

 

Alstroemeria – import

Amaranthus Hanging – red & green – local

Amaryllis – import

Anemone – local

Anthurium – import

Artichokes -baby – red &green limited

Artichokes large – red

Asclepias Cinderella – pink & white – import – $$$

Ascelpias Pods

Astilbe White – import

Astrantia – import

Aster Matsumoto

Aussie Bells – lavender only

Aussie Pine

Bay leaf

Begonia Leaves – import – only advance notice

Bells – import

Bleached Dried Flowers – assorted – import

Blossom – white

Bouvardia – import
Calla – large

Calla – mini

Camellia

Carnations

Chamomile

Chocolate lace

Clematis – Dutch only – no white

Cotton

Coxcomb – import

Cornflower – blue, choco, pink

Craspedia

Cymbidium

Cymbidium – mini

Dahlias – basic colors: burgundy, café, orange, pink, red, white

Daisy Killian – white

Dawn Viburnum Blooming branch

Delphinium Belladonna – dark blue & light blue

Delphinium Hybrid tall – import

Dendrobium

Dianthus Green – import

Dianthus Gypsy (burgundy limited)

Dogwood Branches (not flowering)

Dusty Miller

Echeveria

Eriostemon buds

Eryngium – import

Euc Pods – silver bells

Euphorbia flowering – Dutch

Freesia – local & import

Garden Roses

Gardenias

Genestra – local & import

Geranium – chocolate & peppermint

Gerbera – assorted

Gloriosa – short – import

Gloriosa – XXL – Japan – $$$

Green Mist

Hyacinth – import

Hydrangea – import

Hypericum

Ilex berry

Iris

Ivy

Kale – frilled – white & purple

Kale – large

Kale – Mini

Kangaroo Paw – import

Kochia

Kalanchoe

Kiwi Vine

Lavender

Leucadendron green, safari sunset, jester, goblet, goldstrike, salignum

Lily Asiatic

Lily LA Hybrid

Lily Oriental

Lisianthus – local & import

Limonium – blue, pink & Purple

Magnolia tulip budded branches

Maidenhair fern

Mokara

Muscari – import

Nerine – import

Nigella – pods only, no flowers

Olive branches

Orlaya

Oncidium

Pampas grass – dried only

Peony

Pepperberry – hanging

Pepperberry – upright

Phalaenopsis

Phlox – import

Pieris Buds

Plumosa fern – painted

Poppy Icelandic

Privet Berry Black

Protea King – pink only

Protea Pink Ice

Queen Anne’s Lace – chocolate & white

Ranunculus – local

Ranunculus butterfly – local & Japan

Roses

Rosemary

Safari Sunset

Sage green

Scabiosa – local & import

Scabiosa pods – Dutch only

Scented geranium

Smilax Bags (CA)

Smilax Southern

Solidago

Spray Roses

Spring Bouquet Viburnum

Snapdragons

Star of Beth – import

Statice – seafoam & sinuata

Stock

Succulents

Sunflowers – dark center & red tint – sunbeam & mahogany not available

Sunflower – mini

Sweet Pea – Japan

Sumac flowering

Tinted foliages

Trachelium – import

Tropical flowers – ask

Tulips – single

Tulips – double

Tulips – French

Tulips – frilled

Tulips – parrot

Tweedia

Vanda

Veronica – import only

Viburnum Tinus

Victorian Birch

Waxflower – local

 

 

Limited

 

Agonis

Alchemilla mollis

Artichoke – green – large

Banksia – very limited

Chocolate cosmos – Japan only

Delphinium Hybrid short – local – limited due to weather

Gerbera straight – red & white

Heather White – limited

Jasmine Vine (no flower)

Larkspur – white – extremely limited

Leucospermum – orange only

Protea Pink Mink

Protea – white

Protea Red Baron

Sterling Range – very limited

Thyme

Viburnum Berries – very limited

 

 

Finished/Not Available

 

Acacia foliage – purple feather

Agapanthus – Dutch

Amaranthus – gold

Aster Matsumoto – lavender

Blackberry

Boronia

Calycina

Celosia feather – local

Chocolate Cosmos – local

Cirsium Thistle – light pink

Delph Bella – white

Explosion Grass

Festival bush – import

Gladiola – green

Gomphrena

Grapevine fresh

Grass Bunny Tail (sub Canary Grass)

Heather Pink

Leucospermum – yellow, red & novelty

Limonium Emile

Lunaria

Marigolds

Millet

Nigella – pods only

Plum foliage

Pomegranates

Poppy Pods

Raspberry

Rain Tree pods

Rice Flower

Rose Hips

Stephanotis

Stephanotis vines

Strawflower

Talloberry

Tweedia

Veronica

Yarrow

 

Mornings with Mayesh: December 2018

Mornings with Mayesh: December 2018

 

On this episode of Mornings with Mayesh, Shelley, Dave, and Yvonne answer your questions about flower product availability, Valentine’s Day flowers, proteas, floral installations, and more. Save the date for January 22nd at 10 am EST for our next show and keep on sending in your floral questions!

 

Here is the podcast replay, video, and show notes:

 

 

 

SHOW NOTES

 

FLOWER QUESTIONS

  1. Flower show and tell:
    • Japanese sweet peas, leucadendron, Arena Red lisianthus, Butterfly ranunculus from California, Clooney Pompon Ranunculus,
    • Preserved gardenia colors
      • Cherry Blossom
      • Cranberry
      • Burgundy
    • New Flower 411 update from Mayesh’s purchasing department: https://www.mayesh.com/flower-411-december-2018/
  2. Heidi: I would love to have a list of flowers and when they’re available throughout the year.  I totally know that it would be nearly impossible to have an accurate list of flower availability through a year, but something that’s pretty general I think would be really helpful.  Like ranunculus, for example, it seems like they’re pretty much a year-round bloom, but in May they tend to get kind of spotty with their availability. Some sort of reference guide that indicated what months to expect to have trouble getting them would be dreamy.  Or like peonies, I know they start showing up for real in March, but they seem to make cameos in November/December…. You know, that sort of thing. Is that possible?
    • We have a year-round availability list that you can download from our website but it’s meant more as a general reference guide. There are so many intricacies in growing flowers and timing harvests that you should always reach out to a Mayesh professional when planning your special events. This is especially true if the item is currently not in season locally in the USA. We import from all over the world when local crops are not available and there are usually other floral options. If a particular item is gapping or cost-prohibitive, we can offer alternative florals that work with your texture & color palette.
    • http://info.mayesh.com/flower-guide-offer
  3. **FAVORITE** — Tiffany: How do you determine what new product you will begin to incorporate into your yearly offerings? Do you trial new varieties and gauge them on various levels of stability?
    • Yes, absolutely. Our mission statement says it all. Providing the floral professional with the highest quality, most unusual products sourced from around the world. That being said, not only do we ourselves seek out the next cool thing, but our close relationship with our growers ensures they are showing us their next cool things too! We regularly receive,  vase test and photograph new varieties and try to get as much client feedback as possible, we want to know what you think! We also keep a very close eye on color trends in the industry.
  4. Jasmine: What are some other popular flowers to order other than roses for Valentine’s Day?
    • The world of flower fashion is constantly in flux and depending on your local demographics just about anything goes! Popular higher end flowers we sell for Valentine’s day include cymbidium & Phalaenopsis orchids, garden roses, blooming branches like quince & forsythia, and a staple of most modern floral design are hydrangeas. Many designers are moving away from typical fillers using interesting things like astrantia & astilbe. Being in Arizona we get a lot of “desert theme” floral design, so items like pincushion protea & succulents are high on our list here. It’s really about defining your own style, marketing your brand and staying true to yourself.
  5. Claudia: What’s the best time of the season to buy protea?
    • Proteas are grown in several countries and are available almost all year round depending on the variety you want. Their popularity has increased so much in the past few years that some varieties have become hard to get in large quantities, like the coveted King protea. King protea from California growers are readily available from March through May then the plants slow down and bloom randomly throughout the summer & fall. We also import King protea from places like South Africa and Australia. It’s important to talk to a Mayesh rep when planning an event with King proteas. Their availability can be intermittent as the plant produces blooms sporadically throughout the year. If there is a large demand that wipes out a growers crop, it can take many weeks for the next blooms to be ready for harvest.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

 

  1. Mischa: What is the best way to hold the wet foam in a container to prevent it from falling apart once the flowers are put in the container? Is there a type of tape that is best to use more than another over of the foam.
    • Oasis green or clear waterproof floral tape works best. Also, make sure you are cutting your piece of foam to fit snugly in the container. You can also use chicken wire wedged in the top of the container. This will help eliminate using so much foam as well.
  2. Roger: Also, what is your advice on soaking oasis and mossing it for events that are a couple of hours away from the shop?  Should you soak and moss a few days prior and transport in totes?
    • You can soak oasis up to several days in advance as long as it is submerged. Are you referring to a mossed ball? Or moss on top of Oasis in an arrangement? The moss will help retain water but make sure you soak moss separately and then apply to Oasis or it will act like a sponge and leech the water out of the foam.  
  3. Tiffany: What are the hardiest flowers for installations, I.e. what flowers hold up best and longest either out of water or with limited water (picks). Can you recommend two for each season?
    • Roses, orchids, tropicals, carnations, alliums, hypericum, pods, preserved greens, and most foliages will hold up well. It’s probably easier to tell you what doesn’t: gerbs, some hydrangeas, lilies, tulips, freesia, dahlias, sweet peas and delicate flowers that don’t have a high water content.
    • Roses, tropicals, and carns can stay out of water for hours without showing signs of stress. Cooler to warmer months you can use most anything in the hardier category. Stay away from the delicate category in the heat of summer.

 

FLOWER CARE

  1. **FAVORITE** Claudia: Would like to know care and handling for the king protea and the protea family.
    • Protea are also known as “sugar bushes” and true to their name they need to be hydrated in a floral food to replace their glucose. Plain water just won’t do with these! Protea are fairly easy to care for & can be stored in your floral cooler for a couple weeks. Their foliage has a natural tendency to brown after a while but they can simply be removed and this has no negative effect on the flower head.
  2. Barbara: How do you get different Protea to open up, when purchased closed, or do they continue to open up at all?
    • Proteas are slow openers and usually remain at ~ or close to the aperture at which they are cut. When selecting protea you should purchase them at the stage you want for your finished design. By the time they have any significant opening they seem to already be at the end of their lives.
  3. Can one of your experts talk about processing poinsettia for use in arrangements? They have milky sap, also do they last very long off the plant?
    • Poinsettias are in the euphorbia family hence the milky sap. I find cutting them the rinsing and wiping off the sap with a paper towel and then singeing with a lighter or match will help cauterize them. They actually hold up quite well in designs this way. Or you can purchase mini single 2” plants and use them intact in the design…soil and all. your client has a keepsake for afterward.
  4. Please talk about care tips for flowers for those of us who are in areas that can experience extremely cold temperatures outside. Also if there are flowers that are extremely vulnerable and flowers that are tolerable of the cold?
    • Having had to deliver in freezing cold temperatures and ice storms myself I find that boxing and wrapping in cellophane does the trick. It also can be a nice presentation if done well. Phalaenopsis plants (and most orchids) and poinsettias do not like extreme temperatures and wind can be a problem for them as well.

 

MARKETING NEWS

  1. April: I’m specializing in just a few avenues…bouquet subscription, holiday centerpieces and want to get into wedding flowers. I’m using Instagram, Facebook and a website but not getting much traffic or orders. I could use some marketing advice. How can I really capture attention and make people feel like they need a flower subscription?
  2. Homework!! Research and DM micro-influencers in your community to use in your 2019 Marketing Plan. Try it and let us know how it goes!

 

If you think of new questions, you can post them in the comments below!

 

Flower 411: December 2018

 

 

December is here, which means great new flowers are available this month. Read on to see what’s new, like Icelandic Poppies!

 

 

Just Starting

 

Anemone – local & import

Genestra – local & import

Heather White – limited – short season

Paper Whites – import

Poppy Icelandic

Heather White – limited

Ranunculus – local

Ranunculus – Japan – $$$

Ranunculus – Italy

Ranunculus butterfly – local & Japan

Sweet Pea – Japan

Sumac flowering

Wax – local

 

 

Available

 

Agapanthus – Dutch

Alstromeria – import

Amaranthus Hanging – red & green – local

Amaryllis – import

Anthurium – import

Artichokes -baby – red & green

Artichokes large – red

Asclepias Cinderella – pink & white – import – $$$

Ascelpias Pods

Astilbe White – import

Astrantia – import

Aster Matsumoto

Aussie Pine

Bay leaf

Begonia Leaves

Bells – import

Bleached Dried Flowers – assorted – import

Bouvardia – import
Calla – large

Calla – mini

Camellia

Carnations

Chamomile

Chocolate lace

Clematis – Dutch only – no white

Cotton

Coxcomb – import

Cirsium Thistle – light pink

Cornflower – blue, choco, pink

Craspedia

Cymbidium

Cymbidium – mini

Dahlias – basic colors: burgundy, café, orange, pink, red, white

Daisy Killian – white

Dawn Viburnum Blooming branch

Delphinium Belladonna – dark blue & light blue

Delphinium Hybrid short – local

Delphinium Hybrid tall – import

Dendrobium

Dianthus Green – import

Dianthus Gypsy (burgundy limited)

Dogwood Branches (not flowering)

Dusty Miller

Echeveria

Eriostemon (not flowering)

Eryngium – import

Euc Pods – silver bells

Euphorbia flowering – Dutch

Festival bush – import

Freesia – local & import

Garden Roses

Gardenias

Geranium – chocolate & peppermint

Gerbera – assorted

Gloriosa – short – import

Gloriosa – XXL – Japan – $$$

Gomphrena – limited colors

Green Mist

Heather Pink

Hyacinth – import

Hydrangea – import

Hypericum

Ilex berry

Iris

Ivy

Kale – frilled – white & purple

Kale – large

Kale – Mini

Kangaroo Paw – import

Kochia

Kalanchoe

Kiwi Vine

Lavender

Leucadendron green, safari sunset, jester, goblet, goldstrike, salignum

Lily Asiatic

Lily LA Hybrid

Lily Oriental

Lisianthus – local & import

Limonium – blue, pink & Purple

Magnolia tulip budded branches

Maidenhair fern

Mokara

Muscari – import

Nerine – import

Nigella

Olive branches

Orlaya

Oncidium

Peony

Pepperberry – hanging

Pepperberry – upright

Phalaenopsis

Phlox – import

Pieris Buds

Plumosa fern – painted

Privet Berry Black

Protea King – pink & white

Protea Pink Ice

Queen Anne’s Lace – chocolate & white

Roses

Rose Hips

Rosemary

Safari Sunset

Sage green

Scabiosa – local & import

Scabiosa pods

Scented geranium

Smilax Southern

Solidago

Spray Roses

Spring Bouquet Viburnum

Snapdragons

Star of Beth – import

Statice – seafoam & sinuata

Stock

Succulents

Sunflowers – dark center, sunbeam, mahogany, red tint

Sunflower – mini

Thyme

Tinted foliages

Trachelium – import

Tropical flowers – ask

Tulips – single

Tulips – double

Tulips – French

Tulips – frilled

Tulips – parrot

Tweedia

Vanda

Veronica

Viburnum Tinus

Victorian Birch

Waxflower – local

 

Limited

 

Agonis

Artichoke – green – large

Banksia

Chocolate cosmos

Gerbera straight – red & white

Jasmine Vine (no flower)

Larkspur – white – extremely limited

Leucospermum – orange only

Protea Pink Mink

Protea – white

Protea Red Baron

Smilax Bags (CA)

Viburnum Berries – very limited

 

 

Finished/Not Available

 

Blackberry

Delph Bella – white

Calycina

Celosia feather – local

Explosion Grass

Gladiola – green

Grevilia flowering

Grapevine fresh

Grass Bunny Tail (sub Canary Grass)

Leucospermum – yellow, red & novelty

Lunaria

Marigolds

Millet

Pampas grass

Plum foliage

Pomegranates

Poppy pods

Raspberry

Rain Tree pods

Stephanotis vines

Strawflower

Talloberry

 

 

Coming Soon

 

Anemone – local

Valentine’s Day products

 

 

 

 

 

Mayesh Flower Care Guide Download

 

Flowers can be a delicate business, with some varieties even more delicate than others. With all of these different varieties, it can be hard to know how to properly take care of them. To help with this, we created a Flower Care Guide to share our best tips and tricks of taking care of some of the more delicate varieties.

 

Download our Flower Care Guide and keep it handy whenever you receive new product to process!

 

Mornings with Mayesh: November 2018

Mornings with Mayesh: November 2018

 

On this episode of Mornings with Mayesh, Shelley, Dave, and Yvonne answer your questions about seasonal flowers, Amaryllis care, attaching flowers to stucco walls, design advice for this fall season, foam free installs, and more. Save the date for December 11th at 10 am EST for our next show and keep on sending in your floral questions!
 
Here is the podcast replay, video, and show notes:


 

SHOW NOTES

FLOWER QUESTIONS

  1. Shelley/Dave – can you guys select a few pretty flowers to show off?
  2. Carrie: Since its amaryllis season, wondering if there is any way to speed up getting them to open?
    • Opening time can vary depending on the stage they are cut but 3 to 5 days is usually sufficient. As with all flowers, planning your receipt time is crucial. There are quick dips and floral foods that can help stimulate flowers opening but nothing works better than having them arrive in plenty of time. Did you know that amaryllis, like many other bulb flowers, can be dry stored in a closed box in your cooler for up to a week or more? This means you can order them a week ahead and work them open with TLC.
    • for sure…get these in early
  3. Ruth: With Christmas approaching, I was wondering how long to allow for amaryllis to fully open.  Using them for a Dec. 22 wedding!
    1. I would plan for 3 to 5 days to fully open. Once they start getting close to the stage you want you can put them back in the cooler to slow their development. Best practice is to make a grid of tape over the opening of your buckets and try to get them standing straight up. Amaryllis are very top heavy when they open and have hollow stems that can crimp or crush from the weight of the open blooms if they are leaning at an angle. You might want to purchase some extra long hyacinth steaks or skinny bamboo poles to insert into the stems to give added vertical stability during hydration. The added sticks also make it easier to anchor the amaryllis stems into floral foam if you are using oasis blocks as your design medium.
  4. Carrie: What are good options for pinks and yellow florals in the December month when everything is red, green, white, gold and silver.
    • Most growers won’t let us cherry pick only the seasonal colors when we purchase for our inventory. Since we can’t just buy only the in-demand colors for a particular holiday, at any given time during the year we have a full selection of both seasonal & non-seasonal colors available. Some of my fave pink & yellow flowers in December are Anthurium, Calla lily, coxcomb celosia, cymbidium orchids, Hydrangea, sweet peas & Vanda orchids. For a comprehensive list visit www.mayesh.com/flower-library
    • We also have a great yearly product guide download
  5. Sharron: Is it difficult to get tall Pampas Grass with large plumes in the month of December in California?
    • Although the season for fresh-cut Pampas grass has pretty much ended, we are now offering dried pampas grass. Those of you who have worked with dried Pampas grass know how it can shed so get your surface sealer ready!

FLOWER CARE

  1. Melissa: Since dried flowers and greens are coming back in style, do you have any tips for handling them? I feel limited with their inflexibility and worry if I pair them with fresh flowers in a water source the stems will get soggy and fall out of place.
    • Yeah, so with dried flowers, obviously, they’re dried, they don’t have any moisture in them. So when you’re using them in fresh flower arrangements, you want to create an artificial stem for them by picking and wiring and taping them. You cannot put glycerin-dyed product, glycerin dried or dyed product in water. It’s very important because the dye will leech off of it. You don’t want it getting on anyone’s dress or clothing, or tabletops. Make sure you wire it and tape it, taping will seal it. If you use wire, make sure you’re using always taped wire, ’cause wire can rust in the water. Or use a wooden cowipick, the little wooden plant picks with little wire on it, and you can tape it on.
  2. Roger: I love working with unique floral and doing things a bit out of the box in regards to fresh arrangements. I tend to forage the landscape for bits of added interest to those creations. My question is, when using fresh sprigs of berries, ie, beauty berries, liriope, bittersweet, holly, etc,, what is the best way to keep the berries from falling off the stems. besides not brushing up against them?
    • The trick is harvesting at the right time. If berries ripen too far on the stem they don’t hold well. This gives you a limited window for any given plant. Foraged items are also subject to frost damage and other environmental conditions that can affect their stability. If possible, try targeting the hardier plants like rose hips, hypericum, liquid amber, blue viburnum, callicarpa, and tallow berry. These tend to be pretty sturdy landscaping plants that have berries that hold better.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

  1. Holli: How do you attach flowers to a stucco wall? Some venues have a stucco wall for the “altar” and I have seen photos of large installations on the wall.
    • First get permission at any venue you are not used to working with. Never use nails. I find using removable sticky tabs, Command slate springs or outdoor hooks work fairly well for hanging greenery or lighter product. There are a lot of damage free hooks on the market. Also, check to see if the venue already has nails or hooks in place. For heavier objects, you can create your own trellis or stand to place in front of the wall to attach to
  2. @themrsbacia: Also, you can give some tips for home decorating (autumn/Thanksgiving). I think it will be interesting for people.
    • Sure! I think using gourds as vessels instead of just pumpkins makes for a unique design. Drieds are very popular again and incorporating those with fresh gives a very textured look for fall. Carve out apples for votives or cider. Make garlands out of autumn leaves for the table. Using a clean neutral palette is modern-whites, creams, and greens or go funky with Thanksgiving  “Pinks” muddy mauvey tones instead of the typical orangey fall colors. Wheat placed in wine bottles makes a very clean understated look as well.
  3. Barbara: When working with floral foam, specific flowers are more challenging. What is the best method of insertion for Amaryllis, Calla Lilies and Hydrangea? I have generally pre-inserted a stem so that the soft or hallow stems to do not get clogged, but is there a better, newer method?
    • Pre-inserting a stem to create a hole is a tried and true method. Just make sure your stem is secure and not wobbly and the oasis is soaked. It helps with Amaryllis to insert the hollow stem with the cut stem of another flower ( tuberose works great for this) and then using oasis floral tape around the base to keep it from splitting or in the case of callas from curling. I find using chicken wire and cutting it open helps support these heavier stems as well.
  4. Barbara: Working with Amaryllis, I have used wooden and plastic dowels with wet cotton pushed up to the base of the hollowed stem, near the flower head, which is better, wood dowel or plastic?
    • Either medium is great to add support, I like that you add wet cotton to keep some moisture and also prevent the dowels from puncturing the stem walls.

  5. Courtney: How to do arch installations foam free.

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

 

  1. J E: How can I become a retail seller and how to buy from wholesalers?
    • Depending on your state and country: First, you must apply for a business license, usually post your intent in the local newspaper and then obtain a seller’s permit. Once you have established those two things you should also start your social media presence and portfolio. We like to see that a business is, in fact, a floral related business when registering with us. After that, you can simply go to our website and register and submit your resale license.

 

MARKETING NEWS (Yvonne)

 

  1. Erica: Do we need to build an email list?
    • Girl, yes, you need an email list! You need some way to track all of the incoming leads that you have, and build a database, so that way you can communicate with people. And I’m not sure what part of the business you’re in, but if you’re a retailer, like a traditional retailer, and sales everyday types of things, you want to be able to communicate. And email is not dead, it’s still very important. But as you’re building an email address, then think about other ways that people like to communicate, whether that’s messaging, or through the social media type of thing. But always collect email addresses, always create that list, so that way you can reach out to people. Because it does help. And even with, for example, our things that we do, people want to know about all the different specials, so, and our new blog posts, they can subscribe to that, we send out the newsletters, all the great content, if we create a new download, we need to make sure that people know about that. So, and the same goes for your businesses as well.
  2. Claudia: Have you set up the new list of workshops for the 2019 year yet?
    • Yes, we have and the workshop details will be published on this coming Monday. Stay tuned for more details, but in the meantime, here are the cities and dates that we have planned:
      • January 14-15: San Diego, CA
      • May 20-21: Nashville, TN
      • August 12-13: Austin, TX
      • November 11-12: Columbus, OH

Preserved Gardenias

preserved gardenias

Just in case you’ve been buried in flower stems and haven’t caught up on trending product, bleached, dried, and preserved flowers are all of the rage right now! With that being said, I wanted to make sure you saw these little beauties – preserved gardenias. How cool are they?

Here is a bit more information on these pristine white blooms:

  • the product comes packaged in a box of 4 gardenia blooms
  • the flowers are preserved to last at least 6 months but could last longer
  • the flowers are 100% natural, grown in soil, and harvested at their peak
  • the flowers do not need any water or light
  • available colors: burgundy, cranberry, and cherry blossom (scroll down to view pictures)

 

Some care & handling details from the grower:

  • avoid crushing, pressing or folding the petals
  • avoid prolonged exposure to direct sunlight and high humidity
  • for indoor use only
  • do not water or place the flowers in water
  • may stain when in direct contact with clothing or textiles

 

Let us know what your favorite preserved, bleached or dried product is right now in the comments below.

If you interested in ordering your own you can fill out this order form here or connect with your sales rep. If you aren’t a customer yet, then register here.

 

   

Mayesh Market Preview: October 2018

 

Have you checked out Mayesh Market yet, where you can shop online for Mayesh flowers, live 24/7? Visit mayesh.com/shop to learn more and to register!

 

Check out this small sample of products available now: hellebores, carnations, calla lilies, roses, and peonies!

 

 

If you are registered already, then feel free to start shopping!

 

Mayesh Rose Guide Download

 

With so many rose varieties available in all shades imaginable, it can be difficult to narrow down which rose is perfect for your arrangement or event. To help make the decision easier, we curated a Rose Guide that includes the top-selling roses in each color category.

 

Download our Rose Guide and keep it handy for wedding and event consultations, a reference for new employees, and everyday use when planning the perfect palette!

 

Flower 411: October 2018

 

October brings great new flowers, from peonies from Chile to local ilex! Read on to see what the latest product availability is.

 

*Please note: the Local California and Oregon cut flower season is winding down, product availability is limited.

 

 

Just Starting

 

Callicarpa – limited

Cone flower/Echinacea

Eriostemon

Hydrangea – hot pink, blurple, antique – local

Ilex – gold – Portland

Ilex – orange – local

Ilex – red with leaves – Portland

Lisianthus – light brown – import

Nandina – Oregon

Peony – Chile

Pieris buds – tight buds won’t open – Oregon

Pink Ice Protea – local

Pumpkin Rose Hips

Viburnum Snowball – Chile

Yarrow – yellow

 

 

Available

 

Acacia Foliage – purple feather

Acacia Foliage – Knifeblade

Alchemilla Mollis Local – import

Agapanthus – import

Allium- import

Amaranthus Hanging – green

Amaranthus Upright – green, red, bronze

Amaryllis – import

Anemone – limited burgundy – import

Asclepias – local

Astrantia – import

Banksia Protea – import only – local orange just starting

Begonia Leaves

Bell of Ireland

Bittersweet Vine – orange

Bouvardia – import

Broom Corn

Bupluerum

Cattails

Celosia Feather – limited colors

Camelia Foliage

Chinese Lanterns

Clematis Flower – no white – Dutch

Clematis Pods – import

Cornflower – blue

Cosmos – chocolate – local

Cotinus – purple foliage only

Coxcomb Large – Dutch

Coxcomb -smaller headed – local

Craspedia – local

Crocosmia Flower – local & Dutch

Crocosmia pods – import

Cymbidium – large or mini – New Zealand

Dahlias – burgundy and peach are limited

Ball Dahlias

Delphinium Belladonna – dark blue

Dianthus Green Trick or Green Ball – import

Dianthus Gypsy – hot pink and purple

Eremurus – import

Explosion Grass

Freesia regular – import

Fruiting Branch Persimmon

Fruiting Branch Pomegranate

Gardenias

Gloriosa short – Dutch

Gloriosa long – Dutch

Gerbera – local

Gomphrena

Green Mist

Grevillea Foliage

Grevillea Flower – assorted only

Hellebores – green only- import & Dutch

Hosta – import

Hyacinth – import

Iris

Kale – large – local & Dutch

Kale – mini – local

Kale Frilly – local & Dutch

Kangaroo Paw – import

Leis and Lei strands – orchids and stephanotis

Lilac – import only – $$$$$

Limonium – import or local (limited)

Lisianthus – regular colors (no brown) – local

Lisianthus – light Brown, dark brown – import

Lily of the Valley – import

Manzanita Natural & Sandblasted

Marigolds – yellow & orange

Nerine – import

Ornithogalum – white, yellow, orange – import

Ornithogalum Arabicum – import

Passion Vine foliage w/ flowers

Penny Cress – import

Pepperberry Hanging w/berries

Phlox – import

Privett Berry – green

Queen Anne’s Lace

Ranunculus – limited Burgundy – import – South America

Sages – culinary – Portland

Scabiosa Annual – black & white – local

Scabiosa Annual all colors – import

Scabiosa Perennial – white & blue – local

Scented Geranium

Sedum – pink/brown (almost finished)

Southern Smilax – Texas

Stephanotis

Stephanotis Vines

Sunflower – black center, green center

Tulips – double, frilled, parrots extremely limited – local

Tweedia – local

Veronica – blue & white, limited pink – local & import

Viburnum Berry Black – import

Viburnum Snowball – import only

Waxflower- purple – local, other colors import only

 

 

Limited

 

Agonis

Artichokes – all size and colors

Brunia – silver – $$$$$

Chamomile/Matricaria/Feverfew

Chocolate Lace

Delphinium Belladonna and Waltz – light blue

Delphinium Hybrid – local

Dusty Miller Lacey

Echinops – local

Eucalyptus Gunni

Eucalyptus parvifolia

Eucalyptus Small Leaf  (moon lagoon, gumdrop, bonsai) – extremely limited

Gardenia Foliage

Godetia – limited colors – import

Grevillea Flowering – asst only – local

Jasmine – foliage only – very limited

Larkspur

Lavender English – local production very limited, but plenty of French

Lily of the Valley – local 10st – $$$$$$$

Nigella flower

Nigella pods

Ninebark

Orlaya

Papyrus Lions Head – advance notice required – Costa Rica

Pieris Japonica – barely starting a few weeks out still

Peony Tree

Pokeweed with berries

Protea King white – limited

Smilax Bag

Snapdragons – no burgundy

Statice Sinuata – NO peach

Statice Sinuata

Statice Tissue – heat damage

Strawflower

Sunflower mini – black center

Sweet Pea – Dutch

Vine Maple

Yarrow Cottage – limited colors – import

 

 

Finished/ Not Available

 

Acacia foliage pearl

Amaranthus Yearning Desert white – we are no longer able to import this season because of California Agriculture

Anemone – local

Bear Grass – super length – only available in the late summer now

Bleeding Hearts

Blossom (blooming branches) – all

Chamomile Yellow Daisy – no one grows this anymore

Clematis – local – grower has severe damage – will not cut any for all of 2018

Buddleia

Cosmos – pinks, cream & whites

Cotinus flowering – all colors

Eucalyptus flowering

Delphinium Belladonna – white

Dogwood Flowering

Foxglove

Fruiting Branch – Blueberry

Fruited Branch – Raspberry

Fruited Branch – Blackberry

Genestra

Grasses from Portland

Heather – all colors, all types

Hellebores – all colors except green

Honey Suckle – gapping due to heat

Hops – all forms

Hydrangea Lacecap

Hydrangea Peegee

Japanese maple foliage – red

Kumquats restricted by the Department of Agriculture – not available until further notice

Lace Flower

Lunaria – finished for the year

Magnolia Blooming

Marco Polo Thistle

Marguerite Daisy – white

Mock Orange

Ninebark

Pieris Japonica flowering

Poppies – hybrid & Icelandic

Protea – white

Pussy Willow Fantail

Protea Pink Mink

Ranunculus – local

Shasta Daisy

Snowberry

Spirea – local, Dutch or Japan

Sterling Range Heather

Sweet Pea – Japan

Tallowberry

Thryptomene/Calycina – import

Viburnum Berry – red, yellow, green, blue, black

Viburnum Blooming all types

Viburnum Pink – Mary Milton

Viburnum Popcorn

Weigelia

 

 

Coming Soon

 

Blueberry foliage – purple

Dogwood, Curly Willow, Pussy Willows

Peony from New Zealand – 2 weeks away

Privet – black berries

Spring Bouquet Viburnum

 

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