Archive For The “Education” Category

Mornings with Mayesh: October 2018

Mornings with Mayesh: October 2018

During October’s Mornings with Mayesh, Yvonne, Shelley, and Dave cover some great florist generated questions. They started the morning with Shelley and Dave talking about some of the beautiful fall flowers that are currently available. Afterward, they answered some audience questions that range from flower schools, cake flowers, wire services, increasing your marketing ROI & more. Enjoy and be sure to mark your calendars for November 20th to catch the next show. Also, don’t forget to comment with your new questions!

 

Here is the podcast replay, video, and show notes:

 

 

SHOW NOTES

 

FLOWER QUESTIONS

WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE WORLD OF FLOWERS?:

  • Link to latest flower 411: https://www.mayesh.com/flower-411-october-2018/
  • From IG: What are some great fall flowers available now? So many to choose from, lets do these in show & tell?
  • From IG: When do Christmas greens arrive?
    • We already have some Christmas greens available and are taking pre-books now… hint, hint! We have Port Orford cedar, Douglas & Noble fir & Mixed boxes in stock and If you need to do your Christmas photo shoots & mockups, give us a call and we can bring more in for you.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

  • From Huntress Florals: Can you give recommendations for great floral schools? I’ve taken courses at the market with American School of Floral Design, and with Shelly, as well as Phil Rulloda up in OC. I’m interested in credible International programs as well!
    • I found this great download on SAF’s website that lists all of the floriculture schools in the US.
    • But how do you know which ones are the best? Well, this kind of question is tough to answer because it is subjective. I think it all depends on what you want to learn and how you like to learn. That is when Facebook pages, groups, and Google reviews come in handy.
    • Dave: Most states have florists associations with extended learning programs but I would check local community colleges for classes. I found a bunch by googling local floral design schools, some accredited and others informal.
    • Shelley: This industry is a tough one for training, I find taking some basic classes at an adult continuing education classes are helpful. I know we have a couple of schools we work with here. Texas A&M University has a great floral program and you can get a degree in floriculture. But even having proper training and a degree will not always guarantee you a job or work. Most florists I have worked out really want to see how many years experience you have under your belt. Really nothing beats interning and learning hands-on as you go with more experienced floral designers. This takes many years and doesn’t happen overnight.
  • IG: How do you place flowers on a cake safely?
    • Shelley: This seems to get folks fired up a bit because of pesticides. And yes, it is a valid concern but in all my years of decorating cakes, I never treated the flowers with anything special. Just made sure they were clean and prepped. It is almost impossible to arrange on a cake and not have the flowers touch the icing. I know people who like to lay wax paper down or use a special oasis holder. There are little plastic holders but then they make decorating the cake awkward. 95% on the couples I have worked with have never expressed concern about the flowers being on their cakes.  I have decorated hundreds and the couple’s who are concerned will usually ask for organic flowers or herbs or a design that is around the cake not on it.
    • Because there are more local and organic growers these days the option of organic pesticide-free flowers should be a little easier to come by,  but it is not always possible. Most caterers will cut away the decorated part anyway because the slices are not aesthetically pleasing or the couple uses the bridal cake as a showpiece only and then a separate sheet cake is sliced and served.  I have never had or even heard of anyone getting sick from eating flowers on a cake. You are not consuming the flowers after all.
    • If you are an eco-friendly florist try suggesting fresh herbs or locally grown flowers if you bride seems concerned.
    • Hydroponically grown flowers could make a better choice for cake flowers as well.

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

  • IG: What are the best wire services?
    • Again, I freaking love social sites like Facebook because you can learn so much from others.
      • Florists of Facebook group had 78 comments to a similar question.
        • https://www.facebook.com/groups/676806692409010/permalink/1556621587760845/
        • If you go through everyone’s opinion the main theme is that you shouldn’t use a wire service.
        • Wire services came to be because for Google, people would go to their local florist to order flowers for someone that not local. Wire services provided a way to get those orders filled and also a way to get the payment squared away. Today, many people will just jump on the internet and find a florist in the area of the person they are ordering flowers for. It is so much easier.
        • However, I did see a few advocate that wire services can be beneficial for newer retail shops depending on your demographics. You just need to be sure to do your due diligence and crunch those number to make sure it is a good fit for you.
        • I’m not sure what makes a wire service the best, but I did read in the FB group comments that people had some good things to say about Teleflora, B Brooks and Flower Shop Network:
        • A side comment is that others mentioned Bloomnation. They are NOT a wire service. I like to think of them like an Etsy for flowers that can also help provide things like a website and POS.
        • Shelley: Yes, I am completely in agreement that a wire service is not necessary and can cost a florist thousands of dollars in fees. BBrooks and Bloom Nation are great alternatives. I have belonged to both. BBrooks if you not familiar with is a community of upscale and niche florists and you must be asked or invited to join or you can submit your work for approval and be juried in. They are more exclusive in nature, so that the types of florists they are recommending are all consistently high quality and elegant. While this may sound a little snobbish it does give you a great database of tried and true upscale shops to choose from. I was on the pilot program with Bloom Nation and they essentially were trying to do the same thing but I think they have found it more profitable to have a more general base of florists. Bloom Nation pays you right away for an order less 20% Bbrooks sends you a monthly bill and the fees are very affordable.
  • IG: How to get re-orders? How do you get someone who ordered flowers online to order again?
    • Shelley: Provide excellent customer service and do an outstanding job on their order! Really, I am all about customer service…don’t just be an order taker. Things, like taking a picture of your design and sending it after the delivery, was made, a special thank you note, a small coupon off their next order or waive the delivery charge are some customer incentives.  
    • Once a customer finds a great florist they will usually come right back for future orders. It’s a lot like finding the perfect hair stylist…not always easy for people. Just know that not all customers send flowers monthly..it’s more like once or twice a year. I would invite them to your shop or host an open house to get them in the door as well.
    • Yvonne: Make sure you are collecting some information about your customers that will allow you to market to them. Name, phone number, email addresses are important, but make sure you take note of special dates and personal tastes so that you can have better conversations with them via phone/text, email, direct mail, etc. In addition, I’ve seen florists offer subscription services. So if someone is buying flowers for their partner’s birthday, what a great opportunity to upsell to make them look like superheroes and for you to have guaranteed sales throughout the year.

 

MARKETING NEWS (Yvonne)

  • IG: How do I get more clients from my marketing efforts?
    • I’m a true believer in inbound marketing!!
    • At the very high level, you need to make sure you are creating content that allows people to fall in love with you before they even meet you. You want to fill your sales funnel and push them through that funnel.
    • You need to ensure that your marketing has strong CTA’s (calls-to-action). What do you want them to do, where do you want them to go to get more information, etc. and then ask them to do that.
    • Have a top-notch website that is user-friendly and provides value to your potential customers and customers. Make sure you have somewhere for them to go on your website to connect with you, subscribe to you, get more information from you, etc.
    • Then make sure you collect their information – name, email, etc.
    • After your contacts trust you enough with some of their information, be sure you nurture that relationship by offering more valuable content and stay in touch with them via email.
    • Be sure to occasionally ask for the sale. “Are you ready to order your flowers? Awesome, you can do so here” and send them to your site to order your flowers.
    • This will get you not just more clients, but more of the right kind of clients so that you can spend your extremely valuable time with the right people.

 

Love Mornings with Mayesh? Leave a comment letting us know what you enjoyed most! Also, don’t forget to post your questions for next month’s show. See you soon!

Fourteen Questions To Ask Instead Of “How much would you charge for this?”

 

We’re excited to have Curate’s Ryan O’Neill back on the blog today to revisit last month’s question about pricing, and provide insight on how to rephrase pricing questions to be more productive.

 


 

Last month I talked about why it can be dangerous to ask other florists “how much would you charge for this arrangement?” and the response to the post was incredible. Knowing how to price custom installations from the underbelly of Pinterest is why the Curate floral software was created in the first place. This month, we’re giving you fourteen questions you should ask instead.

 

1. How would you calculate the price on this arrangement?

 

2. Here’s the price I came up with and how I came up with it. Am I missing anything?

 

3. What’s the lowest number of these garden roses that would still look great in this bouquet?

 

4. Would you use a higher floral or labor markup for this arrangement because of its complexity?

 

5. I really want to do this arrangement but the bride is just shy on budget for me to hit my margins. Where can I get beautiful orchids for a more cost efficient price?

 

6. How can I best calculate my markup values to make this arrangement profitable? (Hint, you can use our handy-dandy markup calculator.)

 

Download The Free Markup Calculator

 

7. Will putting this installation together on site require having any extra freelance help that I need to account for in the cost?

 

8. This elevated arrangement is gorgeous but huge. Should I pad my recipe a little bit for this arrangement just in case?

 

9. Has anyone assembled an arrangement like this on site? How long did the installation take you?

 

10. Is there anything special about this arrangement that I need to take into consideration before pricing it?

 

11. What can be done to decrease the price point for this arrangement?

 

12. What’s the best sub for Darcey Garden Roses that has the same color but fits a more “intimate budget?”

 

13. How would you calculate your greenery needed for this?

 

14. How do I break it to my bride how much this is going to cost?

 

 


 

Have another question florists should ask instead of “How much would you charge?” We’d love to hear it below!

 

Mornings With Mayesh: September 2018

Mornings with Mayesh: September 2018

In September’s Mornings with Mayesh, Shelley, Dave & Yvonne cover a wide array of floral questions. They started the morning with Shelley and Dave talking about some of the beautiful products that are currently available. Afterward, they answered some audience questions that range from preservatives for flowers and flower coolers to wedding flower packages & more. Yvonne rounded out the show by announcing our 2019 Mayesh Design Star, Shean Strong!! Be sure to watch until the end to get to know Shean in a quick Q & A — it’s going to an amazing 2019!

Here is the podcast replay, video, and show notes:

 

 

SHOW NOTES

 

WORLD OF FLOWERS

  • Shelley/Dave – can you guys select a few pretty flowers to show off?
  • From Gaye: Where can we find a list of what flowers are available in each month?
  • From Suzanne:  I’m having more and more calls for gold roses. Would like more info on varieties and best farms that have long time availability.
    • There are only a few varieties of gold roses being grown and since they are treated as a “seasonal fall color” most rose growers don’t have a lot of real estate planted in this palette. There are a few great gold varieties in varying gradients of color saturation such as Cappuccino, Caramel Antike, Camel, Combo, Golden Mustard & Toffee BUT these are all difficult to get in big quantities especially for large events. That being said, we may need to piecemeal your orders together using different varieties from different sources. Best advice is to be flexible and supplement by offsetting your arrangements with other flowers in your seasonal color.

 

FLOWER CARE

  • From Joy: How do you keep the snapdragons from bending?
    • Snapdragons are both phototropic (this means they will bend towards a light source) and geotropic (meaning they want to bend away from the center of gravity in the earth). you can get them to straighten by using your favorite flower food, hydrating them standing up as straight as possible in a bucket placed directly under a light source.
    • You can also tip them out. Also, do not lay them down while working with them …as Dave says keep them upright.
  • From Hannah: What flower preservatives do you recommend?
    • Floralife & Chrysal are just a couple of big brand names that work great. It is also very important to know your type of flower. Most cut annuals and foliages can take any brand of standard floral solution BUT most perennial or bulb flowers need a floral solution intended to replace the hormones they are no longer receiving from their bulbs. Properly nourished flowers not only last longer but also look better.
  • From Darlene:  Is there a secret to keeping stock fresh?
    • Changing your water daily & re-cutting stems will keep stock fresher longer. Most floral foods already have a fungicide in them already BUT You can add a couple drops of bleach to help with problem flowers like stock. Bacteria on flower stems can grow out of control in buckets & will cause shorter flower life & foul smelling water. It is good practice to frequently change your floral solution & re-cut ALL flowers to keep bacteria levels down.
  • From Valerie: Is warm water better for most flowers when processing would you say? Than colder?
    • Best practice is always to process flowers in a hydrating solution with a temperature as close to your flowers as possible. The safest way is to prepare your buckets of floral solution the day before and keep them overnight in your cooler. When you receive your flowers, allow them to chill in your cooler for an hour or two before processing them. This way the floral solution & the flowers are at roughly the same temperature. This will cause the least amount of stress on your flowers. Conversely, you can do the same at room temperature instead BUT the cold on cold method is my favorite. When processing roses, you can leave them in their cardboard sleeves from a few hours UP TO overnight in the floral solution after cutting them. This ensures the neck of the stem just under the flower head hydrates properly, firms up & prevents head droop. If your intention is to open your flowers quickly, try using a product like Chrysal easy dip which is a  quick hydrating solution intended to speed the uptake of hydrating solutions.
  • From Valerie: Does Mayesh have any blog post or cheat sheet on processing? If not would be a great resource much like your flower availability pdf?
    • Here is some great information I got from a friend at Chrysal USA a couple years ago:
      • Never use softened water. The high salt content is deadly to flowers and potted plants
      • For some blooms, bottled or distilled water (not tap water) is the best choice.
      • Tap water contains minerals and salts that may cause “pepper spots” on petals
      • Avoid dripping on petals. Allow moisture to evaporate before placing blooms in cooler. Even a microlayer of condensation is sufficient for Botrytis spores to start germinating.
      • Keep cooler floors clean and dry. This is another place botrytis can occur and spread.
      • Clean water, clean containers, clean tools are important when preparing solutions.
      • Follow label mixing instructions–Don’t guess about the dose.
      • Under-dosing gives poor results (bacteria soup) which wastes time & money.
      • Hydration formulas are sugar-free because sugar introduced too early in the system sometimes slows uptake of solution later and can stimulate premature leaf yellowing.
      • Research proves that if only one segment of the chain uses some post-harvest treatment, longevity is still better than using no treatments at all.
      • Most cut flowers are happiest stored between 34 – 38F with the exception of tropical flowers and orchids.
      • For more information and some specific flower examples please stay tuned for our upcoming flower care guide.

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

  • From Eva: I always have customers ask for my wedding packages with pricing but I have been hesitant to provide that since each individual wedding is so unique. What information can I give to a client at the very beginning that gives them an idea of my pricing?
    • Aside from listing your “minimum” on your website, it’s usually a good Idea to have a questionnaire on your website that can help you find out a little more about your bride. Once you move forward to the phone interview you can decide if they are a right fit for you. I addressed this pretty well in our last Mornings with Mayesh if you want to go back and take a look at my thoughts on pricing.
    • I find that most customers who are looking for “packages” are usually more interested in price than design or your work. Back in the day, a few florists would offer a bridal bouquet, a few bridesmaids bouquets and a set number of bouts and corsages for a one budget price. You can handle this a couple of ways. Either by simply saying that you do not offer packages because your work is bespoke and tailored to each bride’S individual aesthetic or simply offer your own unique version of a package with certain guidelines in mind. “I will do this, with seasonal flowers, in your color palette and in this look for X amount of dollars.” Give them 2-3 options. If you want to work with smaller budget brides and/or possibly farm that out to one of your JR designers. Then they could order items a la carte to fit their needs. And be somewhat firm about your guidelines.  I find that most brides end up busting out of the” package mode” of thinking once they sit down and interview with you and find out what a talented creative you are.
  • From Joanne: I met a designer who is selling her cooler for $1800. The dimensions are 8×8 and it’s a walk in. However, I was told I could purchase a CoolBot and that would work just as well. What are your thoughts?
    • We have a lot of customers who use the CoolBot and I have heard nothing but good things about the system. They are cost effective and apparently better for the environment as that don’t use the same forced cooling than traditional coolers use. It basically attaches to any air conditioner. There are some downsides. For example, they take longer to cool and are not as effective if you open the door to your insulated room more than 6 times per hour. You can find out more about them on the company’s website www.storeitcold.com
  • From Hannah: If you are just starting out with a studio doing flowers for events- at what point do you recommend getting a commercial refrigerator?
    • Hi Hannah, I think it’s always a good idea to get a cooler or possibly a CoolBot (see above) right when you start your business. It should be part of the investment that you make when beginning your business. You can start smaller with a commercial beverage cooler if you can’t afford to go all out but it is important to properly store your flowers. Having a cooler really alleviates the stress of trying to keep your flowers cool during our hottest months of the year. Not sure where you are located but It used to be here in California most florists could get away without one, but as we are seeing more climate change and hotter than ever temperatures year round… it’s a sound investment. I do like the CoolBot because it is more eco-friendly than running a traditional cooler. You have to build an insulated room but I think the cost is less than a traditional cooler, which isn’t always easy to find.

 

 

MARKETING NEWS: MAYESH DESIGN STAR INTERVIEW WITH SHEAN STRONG

Announce the 2019 Mayesh Design Star! Watch the segment here.

2019 Mayesh Design Star Announcement

2019 Mayesh Design Star, Shean Strong

 

It’s mid-September, which means one thing in our world … it is time to announce our newest Mayesh Design Star! My team got together to figure out how we are going to shake things up and this time we decided that we were going to observe & select. Meaning, we were paying attention to designers who are active in our community using social media – posts, blogs, live videos, etc. In other words, we did a bit of cyber-stalking. Our method is a bit unconventional, but we are so excited to be working with this designer.

I am pleased to announce that our 2019 Mayesh Design Star is Shean Strong! He is incredibly talented, has a passion for education, and embodies charming charisma that you will get to experience through his videos and workshops.

As usual, we have big plans and are crazy excited about collaborating with Shean. Be sure to stay tuned as we will be announcing our 2019 flower workshop tour plan very soon!

Congratulations Shean!!

We made our first official announcement live on today’s Mornings with Mayesh. So I edited it down to just the part with his interview. Get to know Shean better by watching the video reply here and share your thoughts in the comments below:

 

 

Interview questions:

  • Tell us a little bit about yourself and background, and how you found yourself as a floral designer?
  • What is it about teaching & education that you love so much / are so passionate about?
  • What are you most excited about for the next year as our Mayesh Design Star?
  • Without giving too much away, can you talk a little bit about what you hope our future workshop attendees will gain and take away from your classes?
  • If you could be any flower, which one would you be and why?
  • Now just tell us something fun about yourself, unrelated to flowers!

 

Photo: Shauna Veasey Photography

 

P.S. If you want a piece of the 2020 Mayesh Design Star pie, then get on our radar. Contact me, let us know where to find you on the interwebs, tag us in your posts, invite us to watch your live videos, etc. We want to get to know you and learn about what you are passionate about. Good luck!

Two Reasons Why you Should Stop Asking: “How much would you charge for this?”

 

Today we’re excited to have Curate’s Ryan O’Neil on the blog discussing a somewhat taboo topic in the industry: pricing!

 


 

If you’re on any florist forum, you’ve seen the post. It’s a gorgeous photo that some client has pulled from the underbelly of Pinterest along with a quick question,”How much would you charge for this?” If you’ve ever asked this question, there’s a high chance that the answers to the post hurt your business more than it helped. It’s time to stop asking, “How much would you charge for this?”

 

I get it. In our consults, we speak to florists every day who see arrangements and know exactly what they should cost. At the same time, occasionally they come up against a particular arrangement that’s a bit outside of their wheelhouse, and they have a bride who wants her proposal NOW, creating the need to ask other florists, “how much would you charge for this?” Even though I understand it, here are two reasons why you should stop asking it:

 

1. Your pricing should be based upon the item

 

Any time that you are quoting an item, you are always basing it off of the fact that you should be making adequate profit off of the supplies and the labor going into it. More flowers = more money. More expensive flowers = more expensive item. You’re going to want to “stem count” the item and determine how many of each type of stem you’ll want to add.

In years past, it’s been much more difficult to do these calculations since they had to be done manual. Luckily, technology has made this easier through tools like Curate.

 

2. Every florist has a different markup

 

It’s pretty simple. Everybody is different. Our experience of talking to thousands of florists has led us to believe that there is no industry standard markup on floral work. It seems like the easy route is to find out what others are doing but the reality is that their profit margins and needs are likely so much different than what yours are.

On one particular post, I saw a florist ask for help pricing an arrangement, and someone from a completely different country gave the price they’d charge — In their own currency without even mentioning it. The USD to AUD conversion rate is 1.25, so that poster was getting information that was over 25% incorrect in the simple currency value.

What one florist in South America would charge for an arrangement will not be profitable for a florist in the U.S. because the markups they use are going to be very different, as will the cost they’re being charged by their wholesaler. To ask “What would you charge?” is to neglect a very foundational part of florist business practices which says you should do what is most profitable for your business.

 

Need help figuring out what your custom floral markup should be? Check out our markup calculator.

 

Download The Free Markup Calculator

 

 

So how should you approach the situation?

 

There are some arrangements you see and can easily identify a price point for. Undoubtedly though, there will be a time when you come across an image from a Pinterest bride that has you stumped on what to charge. Rather than asking a florist friend what they would charge, ask them how they would go about calculating a price for the arrangement. Maybe they know that a extravagantly large floral arch over a mansion entryway will take three experienced helpers more than two hours to set up and you’ll need to factor in that additional labor. They could simply tell you to charge $2,000 for the installation because you asked for pricing help. Instead, they can tell you what to factor in. And if you don’t have experienced helpers, you’ll know to factor in a little bit more on the labor side for an extra set of hands or extra hours spent on the arrangement to make the arrangement more profitable, rather than charging $2,000 and barely breaking even or, worse, losing money on the arrangement.

Similarly, if you’re ever asked how you would price an arrangement, turn the conversation around to how you would calculate the price for the arrangement. What’s the base price you’re getting from your wholesaler? What’s your floral markup? Your hardgood markup? Your labor markup? Are you building labor costs into the arrangement or tacking it on at the end of your proposal? There are many parts to consider when pricing an arrangement that you should break down when explaining how you came to your suggested price.

 

This is why Curate was created in the first place. Stem counting is an incredible headache, especially with more complex creations showing up on Pinterest. If you’re wondering whether a software could help, we’d certainly love to do a personalized consultation to hear about your business and see if we can help. Let’s chat.

 

 

Learn More

 

 

Mayesh Design Star Charleston Workshop Recap

 

The year is flying by, and although we have only one workshop left in our 2018 Mayesh Design Star workshop series, we still have our past three workshops to recap!

 

First up: CHARLESTON

 

Our May Charleston workshop was just featured on Botanical Brouhaha, but there are so many more beautiful photos we just had to share.

The workshop was held at The Cedar Room, a dreamy venue located in Charleston’s historic Cigar Factory. With white washed brick walls, tall windows and as much natural light as you could possibly hope for, this venue was more than perfect for our spring inspired workshop.

 


 

DAY ONE

 

As with our Miami workshop, we started the workshop Monday evening with a networking event. The students enjoyed appetizers and wine while meeting one another and watching presentations from Ryan O’Neil of Curate & Jodi Duncan for Design Master. Following their educational presentations, Kaylee discussed the important role mood boards play in her design process, and had each student create their own as a way to help define their style. Everyone – the Mayesh team included! – then went around and wrote a descriptive word next to each mood board, leaving each student with a long list of words to help articulate their style in five words. This exercise was a great way to get the students thinking about their unique styles and coming into day two with more intention.

 

 

 


 

DAY TWO

 

Day two was all about design. Kaylee and her assistant Jamie led the students in a group installation activity. When the students arrived, the ceremony was set up with a simple, bare arch and two large urn arrangements to show one option for a ceremony set up. Then, as a class they created the second ceremony option: a lush floral arch and aisleway installation using spirea, garden roses and peonies.

Following the installation, Kaylee demonstrated how she creates her signature bridal bouquets. The students then designed their own bouquets, finished off with gorgeous silk ribbon from Adorn Company and photographed with local model Hilary Rose.

 

 

Workshop Credits:

 

Taught by Kaylee Young of Flourish by Kay
Photography: Nicole Clarey Photography
Venue: The Cedar Room
Rentals: Ooh! Events
Ribbon: Adorn
Model: Hilary Rose
Dress: Fabulous Frocks Bridal
HMUA: Pampered & Pretty

 

Workshop Product Sponsors:

 

 


 

To learn more and reserve your spot in our LAST workshop of the year in Salt Lake City, click here!

 

Flower Hack: Dried Hops Garland

 

Autumn is just around the corner, which means it’s hops season! And back with another flower hack is Shelley Anders from our Carlsbad Branch!

 


 

Dried Hops Garlands

 

A dried hops garland can be the perfect unique element for any event. For a dried hops garland, it’s best to hang the garland now while it’s fresh – the key is to hang it where you want it to go then DON’T touch or move it or else it will SHATTER. Dried hops garlands make a great arch display, so pre-attach it to a form now, and when your event is here, move the dried, shaped garland to the arch!

 

 

Contact your sales reps today to see hops availability in your area!

 

 

Flower Hack: Sprayed Anthuriums

 

Have damaged anthuriums but don’t want to let them go to waste? Check out this awesome flower hack from our very own Shelley Anders at our Carlsbad branch!

 


 

 

 

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

 

Design Master paint

• newspaper

• piece of cardboard or cardstock

• chenille stem for touch ups

 

 

THE PROCESS

 

 

1. Press firmly but gently against the side you want to leave ungilded.

2. Spray away from that side so there is no fallout underneath.

3. Give the paint a minute to rest and “set.”

4. Remove cardboard et voila!

 

Design Master Anthuriums

Design Master Anthuriums

Design Master Anthuriums

 

 

Design Master colors used:

 

Gold Medal • Champagne Gold • Copper

 

 


 

 

Tag us in your pics if you end up trying our hack (@mayeshwholesale) and let us know in the comments below if you have any other fun Design Master hacks or ways to resurrect damaged blooms!

 

 

Mornings with Mayesh: August 2018

Mornings with Mayesh: August 2018

In August’s Mornings with Mayesh, Yvonne and Shelley cover a wide array of floral questions. They started the morning with Shelley talking about some of the great products that are available including the VIP rose called Westminster Abbey. Afterwards they answered some great audience questions that range from garden roses & how to care for them, how to handle ethylene gas sensitive flowers, to what is the best way to clean up quickly after a large installation, how ordering works for shipping customers, and taking on work that doesn’t really match your brand. It was a show packed full of great information, so be sure to watch the replay! 

#morningswithmayesh

Here is the podcast replay, video, and show notes:

SHOW NOTES

FLOWER QUESTIONS

  • From Bridget: What type of product is local in Miami?
    • Yvonne: Here’s a list of some of the local product that Miami gets in throughout the year:
      Grapevine
      Honeysuckle
      Figs
      False Aralia
      Begonia leaves
      Mini-magnolia
      Poke Weed
      Sugar Cane Grass
      Everglades Grass

 

FLOWER CARE

  • From Kirsten on IG: Can you talk about the different kinds of garden roses, not just David Austin, and how to prepare them for arrangements and how long they last?
    • From Shelley: whether you are cutting them from your own garden or getting them from us or a local rose grower you will need to first remove the packaging and lower leaves. My rule of thumb is ¾ leaves removed ¼ left on. Use any damaged leaves or guard petals to encourage roses to open place in tepid or room temperature water. Use flower nutrients, changethe water every 24-48 hours and keep away from direct light and heat. Allow roses to open fully for your event. Super fresh, tight roses will take 3-5 days to open. Local garden roses will last about a week depending on variety, but some South American varieties will last 2 weeks.
  • Evelyn: Any recommendations on how to keep flowers in cooler fresh. Having problems with Snapdragons especially. I keep them separated from carnations. 
    • From Shelley: Snaps can be sensitive to ethelyne gas so make sure your cooler is clean and filtering properly. Make sure you are cutting with a sharp knife at a 45-degree angle. Keep water cool and clean and use floral preservative. I find sometimes they do well out of the cooler if it is not too hot. You have tip them out as well if they have droopy tips. Generally, they are a long lasting flower.
  • From Desiree: Do most people find astilbe to be a flower that does not last in bouquets because I do. I urge clients to find another flower because I don’t want to water tube and add more weight to an already cumbersome bouquet. Such a beautiful bloom but how can we get past the browning tips and them looking pretty sad mid wedding day?
    • From Shelley: Yes, Astilbe is not known for its longevity that is why it’s best to make sure to buy it in season and especially when it’s offered locally. Astilbe flowers last longer, up to 2 weeks rather than 2 to 4 if placed in hot water first, allowed to cool down and then placed in the cooler. It is a technique that works well with hellebores too.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

  • From Brandi: I never had problems with boutonnières previously, but more recently, they’re been super wilty within a few hours of the bridal party wearing them. Super embarrassing and not a look we would like to have. The stems are exposed, however, they are in water right up until they’re being worn. Help?!
    • From Shelley: Well then the question would be what kind of flowers are you using? How are you storing them? You say you are exposing the stems so I am assuming you are doing more of a wild flower look? Certain flowers still need to be wired. Using crowning glory will help with this. ( I will address further on the show)
  • From Texanna: How do you have beautiful events outdoors with flowers in this heat? What about potted Orchids and Orchids in general and Roses?
    • From Shelley: It is a challenge isn’t it!? Definitely using orchids, plants and heartier flowers like tropicals help. Also, for the first time, we are really seeing a shift in our climate and the environmental changes are really starting to impact us here in Southern California where you could count on really nice outdoor weather year round. It has already started impacting our florists business here. Using a base of silk flowers and then adding in fresh flowers is another option to help combat the heat as well. Remember when working outdoors to wear a hat and gloves and to protect yourself from the heat. It’s really easy to forget how hot it can get when you are setting up outside.
  • Do you all do seminars on arranging?
    • Yvonne: We have some great resources for learning more about flower arranging. First, is our video library that everyone should check out. We have over 400 videos that cover a wide range of design topics and general videos about flowers, care & handling. Typically, we have 1 design video per month that we publish. In addition to our videos, we offer live educational events as well. Currently, we have 1 flower workshop left for the year, happening in Salt Lake City in November. Visit our website for more information. Also, if you want to stay in the know about all of our news & events, then be sure to sign up to receive our emails.
      • http://info.mayesh.com/subscribe
      • http://youtube.com/mayeshwholesale
      • https://www.mayesh.com/mdsworkshop-2018/
  • Melissa: What is the best way you’ve found to clean up quickly and efficiently at a venue after a big install?
    • From Shelley: A large team is essential and if you can’t afford that get yourself some interns or volunteers and get really organized. Make sure you have your own trash cans, bags, brooms dustpans, carts, dollies, boxes buckets etc…so that you are not at the mercy of the venue and that you don’t have to ask to borrow ANYTHING, Make sure you have a well-stocked toolkit. Give yourself time. Familiarize yourself with each venue you work at and learn how long it takes at each venue and how many people you need. Don’t wing it each time. Get a crew you can trust.

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

  • IG: As a new florist, I would like for you to walk through the steps of ordering for the first time and things I should know about delivery. I received a related question from Evelyn: How can we arrange ordering from you and getting the best price on shipping?
    • Yvonne: Once you register your business and we get your account set up, you will be assigned your very own sales rep to walk you through all the steps on ordering and shipping. We have 2 different shipping teams. In general, our Miami shipping division handles the East part of the country and our LA shipping team handles the West side. We can work on quoting you costs for flowers including shipping/packing charges. Shipping costs are calculated by actual weight and dimensions of the boxes so each order may differ as far as shipping goes depending on the size of the order. We ship a few different methods, FedEx priority overnight and Air Cargo (Delta/Southwest/United/American) to your nearest airport. Shipping via airlines for orders over 100 lbs. can be significant savings if you are able to go and pick up from the airport. Picking up cargo from the airport is super easy! We will give you the address to the cargo station as to where you will need to go. It’s usually in a separate area from the airport so you don’t have to interface with airport traffic.
  • Melissa: How do you reconcile specific floral work you’ve been asked to complete that is not up to par with your personal taste?
    • From Shelley: Ah this is always a toughie. When your new and starting out it is always difficult to turn down ANY business. You will do designs that you don’t love and work you will not want to even photograph. It’s very hard, on the one hand, you need to make a living and on the other, you feel that you are an artist and your artistic integrity is at stake. If it is a bridal client it’s a good idea to have a questionnaire on your website that can help you vet your clients and you can gently refer them out to another vendor. Sometimes it’s a learning experience and we need to learn how to say no to things so we can say yes to the projects we love. But listen, in the business, everything is not always Instagram worthy and you will realize that unfortunately, not everyone out there has the same amazing taste that you do. Your amazing skill will be to help that client make it go from drab to fab-u-lous, honey. That is when you know that you are really doing your thang. Even on a budget. Hey, it’s always easy to make things look great with a big fancy budget, a true artist can rock it with no funds.
  • From Evelyn: Any ideas on promoting flowers during slow times.
    • From Shelley: Instagram Giveaways, dropping off flowers to your local schools, churches, hospitals, funeral homes, local wedding coordinators, coffee shops, offering a bouquet of the weeks deal if you own a flower shop. Hold an educational class for mommy and me so that moms can bring their kiddos in to plant a flower or make a small bouquet. Hold an open house and get folks in with free drinks and food give a discount, Hold a Wedding workshop for the bridesmaids ro learn how to make a flower crown. There are many ways to promote your shop or studio that don’t have to be flower related…maybe a potluck or open mic night. I hosted a Kids Ted Talk at my shop that focused on my eco-friendly practices. Participate in your community and network with other shop owners so that people know you are there and get the word out.

 

MARKETING

  • Instagram Reviews of Antelope Valley Florist: https://www.instagram.com/avflorist/
    • For Hashtags … I see that you are in Lancaster, CA, so I would use hashtags like:
      • #lancasterca #lancastercaflorist in addition to #antelopevalley #antelopevalleyflorist and other areas that you
    • Create hashtags for the different pieces of your business:
      • #lacastercaweddings #lacastercaweddingflowers
    • And you can add a few more general ones too: #flowers #

 

Beyond the ‘Gram: Collabs are Fab

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

The much anticipated part three of Shelley Ander’s blog series is finally here! If you haven’t read her two previous posts, make sure you catch up first!

 


 

A long time ago, in a floral galaxy far, far away… there was battle raging on. It was US and THEM… THE COMPETITION. If you owned a florist or floral design company, any other florist around was your adversary. If you spied them at the floral market you nodded, smiled your polite hellos, threw shade, coveted their flower cart and kept on moving. You envied their progress and knowingly applauded their downfall. You may have even pulled a Katy Perry and tried to lure their employees away. No? Oh wait. Was that just me?

 

Oh, who are you kidding Miss Polly Perfect, we’ve all been on that dark side and it ain’t good… In the old days, you stayed on your side of the fence and they stayed on theirs. That was the American Way! Old school florists, you know who you are and what I am talking about.

 

I jest, but it was kinda true. Now don’t get me wrong, you had your florist friends and you may have shared designers, but they were in other cities. The further away from your zip code the better your friendship, and if they were in another state you were practically besties! We were a protective lot back then. There was more than enough business to go around, yet we did not like sharing it very much.

 

All of that is changing. And it has never been more apparent than right now. The newer generation of floral designers (female in particular) have reached an almost zen-like community of inclusion and sisterhood. I see this every day here at Mayesh. Where people barely spoke or acknowledged each other, they are chatting and discussing each others’ carts, the events they are working on and more importantly they are working together. Collaborating.

 

In today’s environment there is much more of a willingness to work together. A new collaborative spirit amongst our designers, new and old. I see more and more of them at our locations chatting, sharing notes and networking than in the past. There is more of a sense of camaraderie. The US is the florist, the THEM the consumer. We are all in this thing together. With the world shrinking due to social media exposure and constant internet access, it is changing the face of the floral landscape for everyone. There is even more competition than ever before, yet there is more collaboration than ever before.

 

A few years back I owned a flower shop. Actually, I have owned two. The first in Dallas, TX in my early 30’s during those floral days of yore. My second was a shop located in the Arts District of Downtown Long Beach. A grungy, bohemian landscape full of millenials, coffee shops and a bootstrap spirit where I had a dream of opening a eco-friendly shop that carried organic or locally grown flowers, upcycled and repurposed vases, and art. My landlord and amazing Oklahomian named Roni Skeen took a chance on me and Primal Flower was born.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram: The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

After practically starving the first year, things started falling into place for my business. People loved my concept and it was really taking a hold in Long Beach. It was early into my second year when I had a lovely email exchange with the very popular, Southern California floral designer and Long Beach native, Megan Grey from Honey and Poppies. One of the originals in the early garden revival movement and exquisitely talented.

 

 

Gorgeous work from Megan Grey | Photography: This Modern Romance

 

I had apparently sent an acquaintance of hers flowers. The young lady’s husband had ordered them from me after finding me online. Megan had seen the flowers and was blown away by them and wanted to know where they had come from. I was so very flattered; of course I knew who she was and was a fan. At the time there were no retail shops in Long Beach doing quite the throwback lush garden look that I was getting known for. Remember that magazine article about Saipua? I had really loved that she had brought that look back and I was fully on board bringing it to my new community in Long Beach. What really impressed me was Megan’s kindness and willingness to reach out to me, someone who could be looked at as her new competitor in town. Well if you could call me that… let’s just say that Megan Gray is in a league of her own. Okay, I say I was impressed… more like shocked.

 

Beyond the 'Gram: The Flower Industry IRL

The design Megan saw & loved from back in my Primal Flower days!

 

But it was one of the first signs of many that I would start to see with this newer generation of florists that I had not really experienced as much with my generation of florists. Not being threatened by each other and a willingness to collaborate and work together. She would send weddings my way when she was not available and I was very appreciative.

 

Collaboration is not necessarily new. Flower shops and florists have for years networked and worked together. I have many times freelanced and helped my flower friends over the years with their weddings and events. I have gone back and worked with former employers and helped them from time to time when the needed an extra hand. But in general, most shops kind of kept a respectful and not always friendly but definitely competitive distance from each other.

 

So what gives now? Why the change?

 

Florists are finding that they need each other as sounding boards and mentors. There is a huge community of online floral chat groups on Facebook alone. You can get support and questions answered from your peers. Things that you may have needed help with but were too embarrassed to ask before. Or maybe you are just super stoked and proud of something you just created and want to share it with your peers. It’s great getting honest feedback.

 

Holly Chapple started Chapel Designers, “an international collective of wedding and event floral designers. The organization not only educates, supports, and mentors creatives, but also encourages the individual designer to be his or her most authentic self.“ And there are great florists blogs out now like Flirty Fleurs and Debra Prinzing who writes a blog and published a book about the slow flower movement.

 

Forming strong alliances with your contemporaries makes smart business sense, especially in this type of business which is heavily dependent on artistic design. Finding a few good florist friends whose work you value and trust to help you out in a pinch during an illness or unexpected family emergency or god forbid an unforeseen tragedy is worth its weight in gold.

 

Another added benefit is continuing education. We are all in a constant state of learning and this strange little business we have all found ourselves often times floundering in has not given us any floral training. Some of us have worked in shops for many years. Some of us have started our own businesses from scratch and are very self taught. Some have gone through the entire AIFD process and gotten certified. But unless you work with other designers of many different degrees of experience and skill level you really are limiting yourself.

 

A new trend we have seen explode in the past couple of years are individual mentoring sessions and workshops. Mayesh has its own Design Star and does a traveling workshop series that promotes continuing education as well as a video series. Many florist now do workshops, and while not necessarily a new thing, the way they are being done and promoted is new. In the past you just showed up at your local flower shop and took a class, and maybe refreshments were served.

 

Our Miami Mayesh Design Star workshop, led Kaylee Young of Flourish by Kay 

 

Now it is an event with sponsors and floral bling. You could walk away with a swag bag of goodies from many different vendors. One-on-one mentoring is relatively new as well. I visited with the wildly popular Rachael Lunghi from Siren Floral Co. during one of her workshops. She is based here in San Diego and hosts many workshops. She also has many florists who fly from all over the country to visit with her to learn her special mojo during paid mentorships. Her classes are always full of hip women: young and mature, newbies and OG’s who want to learn from this magical, ethereal young lady.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

In the past you could barely get your fellow floral designers, manager, head designer or contemporaries to teach you anything so great was the fear that they would steal something from you… your talent or your clients. Not so much anymore.

 

I recently interviewed the enormously talented and very lovely Carla Kayes owner of Carla Kayes Floral Design in Temecula about the recent trend with the newer generation of florists’ more collaborative spirit: “I feel like I have gained so much by helping somebody else because everybody does something different, and they possibly do something more successfully or more efficiently than what you do.” She also adds that “ten years ago it was a different story, things were ugly. Now people work together and it makes everyone better, we all get better when we share information and knowledge.” Carla should know, she has had one of the most successful rebranding campaigns of recent memory and a lot of it had to do with her willingness to learn from and work with her newer contemporaries.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

This also helps create a united front when it comes to pricing strategies, something florists have always struggled with. If everyone is on the same page and and keeps pricing transparent and open, it helps with consumers who are price shopping. I have heard from several of my clients who have told me that because of the open, collaborative nature of their relationships with other wedding florists and shops that when they are price shopped, they all can discuss it… “oh yeah, that bride hit me up too.” At least they can feel confident that they are being chosen for their work and not just because the were the cheapest.

 

With the explosion of one-on-one mentorships, workshops and webinars there are more and more ways to learn and work as a florist these days. Don’t be afraid to reach out to a florist you admire and ask about networking or freelancing for them.

 

 


 

 

A few tips that are helpful and will give you major cred in the business::

 

 

  • Always be respectful of their work. Absolutely ask permission to photograph any work that you are doing for them. It is their intellectual property.

 

  • Always tag them and request permission to use any photos of said work on social media.

 

  • Do not post their work as your own… yes it has been done countless times. (I have been a victim of this)

 

  • Respect their neighborhood, find your own area or zip code to work in that doesn’t cause a conflict of interest. For example don’t host a workshop or event a street over from your friend’s flower shop.

 

  • Have integrity! Never try to steal a client out from under your florist friend.

 

  • Be inclusive. When holding events, or group get togethers always try to invite or include flower friends in your network. The floral world is a small world and news travels fast! #nofrenemies

 

  • Don’t steal staff from another flower friend. Did Katy Perry and Tay Tay not teach us anything? Flower feuds are not any prettier.

 

  • Make sure you are there to work and not just there to get a free “workshop” out of your chosen florist. It’s okay to fangirl, but have integrity here too. Keep the million questions and digging into vendor secrets to yourself. People have worked hard to get where they are and you baby florist, need to learn how earn your stripes too. You will be much more respected and asked back in the future. They will see right through your shenanigans. Sign a non-compete in these instances.

 

  • Above all, do unto others as you would have done to you.

 

 

#beyondthegram , Beyond the 'Gram , Shelley Anders

 

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