Archive For The “Business & Tech” Category

Mornings with Mayesh: August 2018

Mornings with Mayesh: August 2018

In August’s Mornings with Mayesh, Yvonne and Shelley cover a wide array of floral questions. They started the morning with Shelley talking about some of the great products that are available including the VIP rose called Westminster Abbey. Afterwards they answered some great audience questions that range from garden roses & how to care for them, how to handle ethylene gas sensitive flowers, to what is the best way to clean up quickly after a large installation, how ordering works for shipping customers, and taking on work that doesn’t really match your brand. It was a show packed full of great information, so be sure to watch the replay! 

#morningswithmayesh

Here is the podcast replay, video, and show notes:

PODCAST COMING SOON (WEDNESDAY)

SHOW NOTES

FLOWER QUESTIONS

  • From Bridget: What type of product is local in Miami?
    • Yvonne: Here’s a list of some of the local product that Miami gets in throughout the year:
      Grapevine
      Honeysuckle
      Figs
      False Aralia
      Begonia leaves
      Mini-magnolia
      Poke Weed
      Sugar Cane Grass
      Everglades Grass

 

FLOWER CARE

  • From Kirsten on IG: Can you talk about the different kinds of garden roses, not just David Austin, and how to prepare them for arrangements and how long they last?
    • From Shelley: whether you are cutting them from your own garden or getting them from us or a local rose grower you will need to first remove the packaging and lower leaves. My rule of thumb is ¾ leaves removed ¼ left on. Use any damaged leaves or guard petals to encourage roses to open place in tepid or room temperature water. Use flower nutrients, changethe water every 24-48 hours and keep away from direct light and heat. Allow roses to open fully for your event. Super fresh, tight roses will take 3-5 days to open. Local garden roses will last about a week depending on variety, but some South American varieties will last 2 weeks.
  • Evelyn: Any recommendations on how to keep flowers in cooler fresh. Having problems with Snapdragons especially. I keep them separated from carnations. 
    • From Shelley: Snaps can be sensitive to ethelyne gas so make sure your cooler is clean and filtering properly. Make sure you are cutting with a sharp knife at a 45-degree angle. Keep water cool and clean and use floral preservative. I find sometimes they do well out of the cooler if it is not too hot. You have tip them out as well if they have droopy tips. Generally, they are a long lasting flower.

  • From Desiree: Do most people find astilbe to be a flower that does not last in bouquets because I do. I urge clients to find another flower because I don’t want to water tube and add more weight to an already cumbersome bouquet. Such a beautiful bloom but how can we get past the browning tips and them looking pretty sad mid wedding day?
    • From Shelley: Yes, Astilbe is not known for its longevity that is why it’s best to make sure to buy it in season and especially when it’s offered locally. Astilbe flowers last longer, up to 2 weeks rather than 2 to 4 if placed in hot water first, allowed to cool down and then placed in the cooler. It is a technique that works well with hellebores too.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

  • From Brandi: I never had problems with boutonnières previously, but more recently, they’re been super wilty within a few hours of the bridal party wearing them. Super embarrassing and not a look we would like to have. The stems are exposed, however, they are in water right up until they’re being worn. Help?!
    • From Shelley: Well then the question would be what kind of flowers are you using? How are you storing them? You say you are exposing the stems so I am assuming you are doing more of a wild flower look? Certain flowers still need to be wired. Using crowning glory will help with this. ( I will address further on the show)
  • From Texanna: How do you have beautiful events outdoors with flowers in this heat? What about potted Orchids and Orchids in general and Roses?
    • From Shelley: It is a challenge isn’t it!? Definitely using orchids, plants and heartier flowers like tropicals help. Also, for the first time, we are really seeing a shift in our climate and the environmental changes are really starting to impact us here in Southern California where you could count on really nice outdoor weather year round. It has already started impacting our florists business here. Using a base of silk flowers and then adding in fresh flowers is another option to help combat the heat as well. Remember when working outdoors to wear a hat and gloves and to protect yourself from the heat. It’s really easy to forget how hot it can get when you are setting up outside.
  • Do you all do seminars on arranging?
    • Yvonne: We have some great resources for learning more about flower arranging. First, is our video library that everyone should check out. We have over 400 videos that cover a wide range of design topics and general videos about flowers, care & handling. Typically, we have 1 design video per month that we publish. In addition to our videos, we offer live educational events as well. Currently, we have 1 flower workshop left for the year, happening in Salt Lake City in November. Visit our website for more information. Also, if you want to stay in the know about all of our news & events, then be sure to sign up to receive our emails.
      • http://info.mayesh.com/subscribe
      • http://youtube.com/mayeshwholesale
      • https://www.mayesh.com/mdsworkshop-2018/
  • Melissa: What is the best way you’ve found to clean up quickly and efficiently at a venue after a big install?
    • From Shelley: A large team is essential and if you can’t afford that get yourself some interns or volunteers and get really organized. Make sure you have your own trash cans, bags, brooms dustpans, carts, dollies, boxes buckets etc…so that you are not at the mercy of the venue and that you don’t have to ask to borrow ANYTHING, Make sure you have a well-stocked toolkit. Give yourself time. Familiarize yourself with each venue you work at and learn how long it takes at each venue and how many people you need. Don’t wing it each time. Get a crew you can trust.

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

  • IG: As a new florist, I would like for you to walk through the steps of ordering for the first time and things I should know about delivery. I received a related question from Evelyn: How can we arrange ordering from you and getting the best price on shipping?
    • Yvonne: Once you register your business and we get your account set up, you will be assigned your very own sales rep to walk you through all the steps on ordering and shipping. We have 2 different shipping teams. In general, our Miami shipping division handles the East part of the country and our LA shipping team handles the West side. We can work on quoting you costs for flowers including shipping/packing charges. Shipping costs are calculated by actual weight and dimensions of the boxes so each order may differ as far as shipping goes depending on the size of the order. We ship a few different methods, FedEx priority overnight and Air Cargo (Delta/Southwest/United/American) to your nearest airport. Shipping via airlines for orders over 100 lbs. can be significant savings if you are able to go and pick up from the airport. Picking up cargo from the airport is super easy! We will give you the address to the cargo station as to where you will need to go. It’s usually in a separate area from the airport so you don’t have to interface with airport traffic.
  • Melissa: How do you reconcile specific floral work you’ve been asked to complete that is not up to par with your personal taste?
    • From Shelley: Ah this is always a toughie. When your new and starting out it is always difficult to turn down ANY business. You will do designs that you don’t love and work you will not want to even photograph. It’s very hard, on the one hand, you need to make a living and on the other, you feel that you are an artist and your artistic integrity is at stake. If it is a bridal client it’s a good idea to have a questionnaire on your website that can help you vet your clients and you can gently refer them out to another vendor. Sometimes it’s a learning experience and we need to learn how to say no to things so we can say yes to the projects we love. But listen, in the business, everything is not always Instagram worthy and you will realize that unfortunately, not everyone out there has the same amazing taste that you do. Your amazing skill will be to help that client make it go from drab to fab-u-lous, honey. That is when you know that you are really doing your thang. Even on a budget. Hey, it’s always easy to make things look great with a big fancy budget, a true artist can rock it with no funds.
  • From Evelyn: Any ideas on promoting flowers during slow times.
    • From Shelley: Instagram Giveaways, dropping off flowers to your local schools, churches, hospitals, funeral homes, local wedding coordinators, coffee shops, offering a bouquet of the weeks deal if you own a flower shop. Hold an educational class for mommy and me so that moms can bring their kiddos in to plant a flower or make a small bouquet. Hold an open house and get folks in with free drinks and food give a discount, Hold a Wedding workshop for the bridesmaids ro learn how to make a flower crown. There are many ways to promote your shop or studio that don’t have to be flower related…maybe a potluck or open mic night. I hosted a Kids Ted Talk at my shop that focused on my eco-friendly practices. Participate in your community and network with other shop owners so that people know you are there and get the word out.

 

MARKETING

  • Instagram Reviews of Antelope Valley Florist: https://www.instagram.com/avflorist/
    • For Hashtags … I see that you are in Lancaster, CA, so I would use hashtags like:
      • #lancasterca #lancastercaflorist in addition to #antelopevalley #antelopevalleyflorist and other areas that you
    • Create hashtags for the different pieces of your business:
      • #lacastercaweddings #lacastercaweddingflowers
    • And you can add a few more general ones too: #flowers #

 

Beyond the ‘Gram: Collabs are Fab

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

The much anticipated part three of Shelley Ander’s blog series is finally here! If you haven’t read her two previous posts, make sure you catch up first!

 


 

A long time ago, in a floral galaxy far, far away… there was battle raging on. It was US and THEM… THE COMPETITION. If you owned a florist or floral design company, any other florist around was your adversary. If you spied them at the floral market you nodded, smiled your polite hellos, threw shade, coveted their flower cart and kept on moving. You envied their progress and knowingly applauded their downfall. You may have even pulled a Katy Perry and tried to lure their employees away. No? Oh wait. Was that just me?

 

Oh, who are you kidding Miss Polly Perfect, we’ve all been on that dark side and it ain’t good… In the old days, you stayed on your side of the fence and they stayed on theirs. That was the American Way! Old school florists, you know who you are and what I am talking about.

 

I jest, but it was kinda true. Now don’t get me wrong, you had your florist friends and you may have shared designers, but they were in other cities. The further away from your zip code the better your friendship, and if they were in another state you were practically besties! We were a protective lot back then. There was more than enough business to go around, yet we did not like sharing it very much.

 

All of that is changing. And it has never been more apparent than right now. The newer generation of floral designers (female in particular) have reached an almost zen-like community of inclusion and sisterhood. I see this every day here at Mayesh. Where people barely spoke or acknowledged each other, they are chatting and discussing each others’ carts, the events they are working on and more importantly they are working together. Collaborating.

 

In today’s environment there is much more of a willingness to work together. A new collaborative spirit amongst our designers, new and old. I see more and more of them at our locations chatting, sharing notes and networking than in the past. There is more of a sense of camaraderie. The US is the florist, the THEM the consumer. We are all in this thing together. With the world shrinking due to social media exposure and constant internet access, it is changing the face of the floral landscape for everyone. There is even more competition than ever before, yet there is more collaboration than ever before.

 

A few years back I owned a flower shop. Actually, I have owned two. The first in Dallas, TX in my early 30’s during those floral days of yore. My second was a shop located in the Arts District of Downtown Long Beach. A grungy, bohemian landscape full of millenials, coffee shops and a bootstrap spirit where I had a dream of opening a eco-friendly shop that carried organic or locally grown flowers, upcycled and repurposed vases, and art. My landlord and amazing Oklahomian named Roni Skeen took a chance on me and Primal Flower was born.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram: The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

After practically starving the first year, things started falling into place for my business. People loved my concept and it was really taking a hold in Long Beach. It was early into my second year when I had a lovely email exchange with the very popular, Southern California floral designer and Long Beach native, Megan Grey from Honey and Poppies. One of the originals in the early garden revival movement and exquisitely talented.

 

 

Gorgeous work from Megan Grey | Photography: This Modern Romance

 

I had apparently sent an acquaintance of hers flowers. The young lady’s husband had ordered them from me after finding me online. Megan had seen the flowers and was blown away by them and wanted to know where they had come from. I was so very flattered; of course I knew who she was and was a fan. At the time there were no retail shops in Long Beach doing quite the throwback lush garden look that I was getting known for. Remember that magazine article about Saipua? I had really loved that she had brought that look back and I was fully on board bringing it to my new community in Long Beach. What really impressed me was Megan’s kindness and willingness to reach out to me, someone who could be looked at as her new competitor in town. Well if you could call me that… let’s just say that Megan Gray is in a league of her own. Okay, I say I was impressed… more like shocked.

 

Beyond the 'Gram: The Flower Industry IRL

The design Megan saw & loved from back in my Primal Flower days!

 

But it was one of the first signs of many that I would start to see with this newer generation of florists that I had not really experienced as much with my generation of florists. Not being threatened by each other and a willingness to collaborate and work together. She would send weddings my way when she was not available and I was very appreciative.

 

Collaboration is not necessarily new. Flower shops and florists have for years networked and worked together. I have many times freelanced and helped my flower friends over the years with their weddings and events. I have gone back and worked with former employers and helped them from time to time when the needed an extra hand. But in general, most shops kind of kept a respectful and not always friendly but definitely competitive distance from each other.

 

So what gives now? Why the change?

 

Florists are finding that they need each other as sounding boards and mentors. There is a huge community of online floral chat groups on Facebook alone. You can get support and questions answered from your peers. Things that you may have needed help with but were too embarrassed to ask before. Or maybe you are just super stoked and proud of something you just created and want to share it with your peers. It’s great getting honest feedback.

 

Holly Chapple started Chapel Designers, “an international collective of wedding and event floral designers. The organization not only educates, supports, and mentors creatives, but also encourages the individual designer to be his or her most authentic self.“ And there are great florists blogs out now like Flirty Fleurs and Debra Prinzing who writes a blog and published a book about the slow flower movement.

 

Forming strong alliances with your contemporaries makes smart business sense, especially in this type of business which is heavily dependent on artistic design. Finding a few good florist friends whose work you value and trust to help you out in a pinch during an illness or unexpected family emergency or god forbid an unforeseen tragedy is worth its weight in gold.

 

Another added benefit is continuing education. We are all in a constant state of learning and this strange little business we have all found ourselves often times floundering in has not given us any floral training. Some of us have worked in shops for many years. Some of us have started our own businesses from scratch and are very self taught. Some have gone through the entire AIFD process and gotten certified. But unless you work with other designers of many different degrees of experience and skill level you really are limiting yourself.

 

A new trend we have seen explode in the past couple of years are individual mentoring sessions and workshops. Mayesh has its own Design Star and does a traveling workshop series that promotes continuing education as well as a video series. Many florist now do workshops, and while not necessarily a new thing, the way they are being done and promoted is new. In the past you just showed up at your local flower shop and took a class, and maybe refreshments were served.

 

Our Miami Mayesh Design Star workshop, led Kaylee Young of Flourish by Kay 

 

Now it is an event with sponsors and floral bling. You could walk away with a swag bag of goodies from many different vendors. One-on-one mentoring is relatively new as well. I visited with the wildly popular Rachael Lunghi from Siren Floral Co. during one of her workshops. She is based here in San Diego and hosts many workshops. She also has many florists who fly from all over the country to visit with her to learn her special mojo during paid mentorships. Her classes are always full of hip women: young and mature, newbies and OG’s who want to learn from this magical, ethereal young lady.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

In the past you could barely get your fellow floral designers, manager, head designer or contemporaries to teach you anything so great was the fear that they would steal something from you… your talent or your clients. Not so much anymore.

 

I recently interviewed the enormously talented and very lovely Carla Kayes owner of Carla Kayes Floral Design in Temecula about the recent trend with the newer generation of florists’ more collaborative spirit: “I feel like I have gained so much by helping somebody else because everybody does something different, and they possibly do something more successfully or more efficiently than what you do.” She also adds that “ten years ago it was a different story, things were ugly. Now people work together and it makes everyone better, we all get better when we share information and knowledge.” Carla should know, she has had one of the most successful rebranding campaigns of recent memory and a lot of it had to do with her willingness to learn from and work with her newer contemporaries.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

This also helps create a united front when it comes to pricing strategies, something florists have always struggled with. If everyone is on the same page and and keeps pricing transparent and open, it helps with consumers who are price shopping. I have heard from several of my clients who have told me that because of the open, collaborative nature of their relationships with other wedding florists and shops that when they are price shopped, they all can discuss it… “oh yeah, that bride hit me up too.” At least they can feel confident that they are being chosen for their work and not just because the were the cheapest.

 

With the explosion of one-on-one mentorships, workshops and webinars there are more and more ways to learn and work as a florist these days. Don’t be afraid to reach out to a florist you admire and ask about networking or freelancing for them.

 

 


 

 

A few tips that are helpful and will give you major cred in the business::

 

 

  • Always be respectful of their work. Absolutely ask permission to photograph any work that you are doing for them. It is their intellectual property.

 

  • Always tag them and request permission to use any photos of said work on social media.

 

  • Do not post their work as your own… yes it has been done countless times. (I have been a victim of this)

 

  • Respect their neighborhood, find your own area or zip code to work in that doesn’t cause a conflict of interest. For example don’t host a workshop or event a street over from your friend’s flower shop.

 

  • Have integrity! Never try to steal a client out from under your florist friend.

 

  • Be inclusive. When holding events, or group get togethers always try to invite or include flower friends in your network. The floral world is a small world and news travels fast! #nofrenemies

 

  • Don’t steal staff from another flower friend. Did Katy Perry and Tay Tay not teach us anything? Flower feuds are not any prettier.

 

  • Make sure you are there to work and not just there to get a free “workshop” out of your chosen florist. It’s okay to fangirl, but have integrity here too. Keep the million questions and digging into vendor secrets to yourself. People have worked hard to get where they are and you baby florist, need to learn how earn your stripes too. You will be much more respected and asked back in the future. They will see right through your shenanigans. Sign a non-compete in these instances.

 

  • Above all, do unto others as you would have done to you.

 

 

#beyondthegram , Beyond the 'Gram , Shelley Anders

 

The Floral Gathering

Floral Gathering Portland

 

We’re smack dab in the middle of wedding season, and I’m going to go out on a limb and say that the majority of you are a little bit tired and a lotta bit in need of a mental reset! Well, the ladies of Good Seed Floral  and Brier + Ivy in Portland, OR are fully aware of the struggle, and they decided to do something about it! In our ever evolving industry, where collaboration and community between floral designers is flourishing, they decided to start The Floral Gathering, an opportunity for designers to come together to play with flowers and connect with one another over a meal. Our very own Jocelyn Kehrle attended the first Floral Gathering last night… here’s what she had to say!

 


 

I had the opportunity to attend the first Floral Gathering in Portland tonight! It’s all about bringing our floral community together and making beautiful floral arrangements. Amy from Brier + Ivy and Joanna and Taylor from Good Seed Floral hosted the event. It was beautiful and intimate and we created a whole lot of beautiful things! Foraged Blooms attended as well as BLUE Floral Company, For the Love of Floral, Hart Floral, Vanessa Schmidt Co. and Lou + You Florals. It was an evening filled with gorgeous blooms, beautiful people and friends!

 

 

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

 

We absolutely love this idea, and are so inspired by the collaborative nature of the floral industry right now. If your floral community does something similar, let us know! We’d love to share the different ways our customers are connecting, working together, or just dealing with the craziness that comes with being a florist. Cheers to you!

 

Mornings with Mayesh: July 2018

Mornings with Mayesh

 

During July’s Mornings with Mayesh episode, Yvonne, Dave, and Shelley discuss the world of flowers. See a great selection of flowers that are available now and learn more about peony season. In addition, they answer some great audience questions like: how long can stems be out of water before needing a fresh cut, can you use flowers cut from your garden, tips on designing with dahlias and hydrangea, how far in advance can you start designing for an event, tips on providing green or eco-friendly flowers, favorite vase sources, marketing to find your right client, how to find the best hashtags to use for your floral business, and so much more.

#morningswithmayesh

Here is the podcast replay, video and show notes:

 

 

SHOW NOTES

 

FLOWER QUESTIONS

  • WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE WORLD OF FLOWERS?
    • https://www.mayesh.com/flower-411-july-2018/
    • Shelley: We have some cool Oregon product I pulled. I have black hollyhocks and rudbeckia etc..
    • Dave: I have some cool bleached white umbrella fern from Japan, giant astilbe on steroids from Holland, tree of heaven from California & nigella pods from California.
  • From Muffy: With Wedding season in full swing, can you let us know the availability on Peonies as it seems all the brides want them in their bouquets. Since the local markets here are now finished, we all need an alternative supplier or list of suppliers for this flower.
    • Dave: We are so lucky to have peonies almost all year round these days. Unfortunately, they do sporadically gap in availability as we transition from the geography where they are producing. We expect to get our next shipment from Alaska & it should hit sometime in the next few weeks and last into September. Peonies are typically cut in mass harvests and can be cold-stored for several weeks without compromising their integrity. This means the Alaska season can extend several more weeks into October. There is usually a short gap until we see production from our Chilean and New Zealand growers sometime in early November. Between that crop and some Dutch production, these usually carry us through until Israel hits in February. It’s always a good idea to have a backup flower in mind when your event hits on a seasonal cusp. Most peonies are field or greenhouse grown and variations in seasonal weather can change the expected cut date by weeks.

 

FLOWER CARE

  • From Jen & Jesse: How long can a stem stay out of water before you should really give it a fresh cut again?
    • Dave: I would re-cut the stems every time they are removed from the water for more than a few minutes. Most flower food manufacturers directions state to recut the stems every other day before inserting them back into your freshly prepared floral food hydrating solution. By re-cutting them you are removing the part of the stem that holds air bubbles & bacteria that can clog stems, prevent proper water uptake and shorten the life of your flowers.
      from
    • Shelley: correct Dave, a good way to tell if they need to be re-cut when you are designing with them for long periods of time if they are out of water is to check the end of the cut stem. If it’s starting to discolor or looks dry give it a fresh cut. If they still have water clinging to them they will usually be ok. Flowers should be re-cut after 2-10 minutes but can stay out of water for up to 2 hours. When in doubt always recut! it’s worth the extra effort and few minutes of your time.
  • From Kirsten: talk about how to handle different kinds of flowers cut this time of the year from our own gardens and how they hold up. hydrangeas are funky from the garden, they are dead in 24 hours. other flowers? tips?
    • Dave: When you are foraging from your garden it is a good idea to vase test all of your desired cuttings prior to using them in events. If they’re not at your cut flower wholesaler it’s for a reason. The varieties we sell have been selected or specifically bred to handle the stresses of cutting, shipping, and handling. Some garden flowers may lack the resilience needed for the rigors of cut flower design. Quick example, South American hydrangea growers have crossbred our more sensitive deciduous North American varieties with an evergreen variety native to tropical regions. This has created some very hardy hydrangea varieties that travel well and have a hugely increased vase life.
  • From Lynn – I love using Dahlias in our florals but seem to have various degrees of success. Hints???
    • Dave: We are in the height of dahlia season now and they are a real treat! They are a slightly sensitive flower so proper hydration in a floral food intended for bulb flowers is crucial. Keep them happy by refreshing their floral solution every other day and in a proper floral cooler at around 36 degrees F before and after design. By pampering them upon receiving they should firm up and be able to handle the stresses of design and ceremony. These are great wedding & event flowers but I would not recommend them for a weekly installation, 5 days is a good life expectancy for this flower.
    • Shelley: I especially prefer ball dahlias they seem to hold up the best.
  • From Patricia: My question is your suggestion for bouquets with hydrangea, particularly when they want the bouquets early for photos.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

  • From Brianna: How many days in advance do you start styling?
    • Shelley: Styling or designing? You can begin prep work on your wedding on Monday prior.
      You can process hardier flowers like roses, get containers ready, inventory everything.. etc.
      You can begin designing some of the centerpieces and cocktails or smaller arrangements on Wed, Personals I usually will do the day before or the morning of if time allows. Large install pieces can be prepped ahead of time and then installed and completed on site. It depends on your level of work and refrigeration you have. How much workspace you have and additional staff. Most small to moderate weddings can be completed in 2 days, larger weddings require more time and work and a bigger staff.
  • From Kirsten: talk about green (environmentally) weddings and how to use flowers thoughtfully – I have a bride who wants this
    • Shelley: this is a topic dear to my heart. I used to own an environmentally friendly flower shop here in CA. In South American product look for Veriflora certified product if possible or the rainforest alliance seal. Also, try to only buy American grown or locally grown product if you can. This is going to limit some of your options of product but you can do lovely wildflower inspired looks with locally grown flowers and garden roses. You need to convey these types of requests to your sales rep here. We, as a company, have worked very hard to offer a robust variety and selection from California, Oregon, and Washington. The use of plants and succulents in your designs is also another way to have a reusable product for the bride after the wedding. She can plant or give away these to guests. Using drieds is also very environmentally friendly. Drying your excess flowers and then using them in designs which is very on trend right now, is a perfect way to keep them from going into the garbage at the end of the day. I sold tons of dried flowers that I preserved myself at my shop and most florists would have thrown all of those away.
      Limit the use of floral foam if at all possible. Try to avoid using containers that require foam.
      Offer to create a program or find a program that will pick up and donate the leftover wedding flowers and deliver them to nursing homes, hospitals etc..
      Upcycle containers, jars and other vessels start a vase exchange program. Have the bride’s family donate containers that are sentimental of heirloom instead of buying more glass from China, or import containers. Or rent your containers so that they may be repeatedly used.
      Dave: When you purchase flowers from us you already are involved! Mayesh buys farm direct and has aligned with 100’s of growers all over the world that are committed to sustainability. This encompasses all aspects from proper land and water use, crop rotation and soil preservation, wildlife and habitat protection around their farms, safe and nontoxic working and living environment for workers, proper handling and disposal of chemicals and the list goes on.

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

  • From Brianna: What are your favorite go-to places for buying vases?
    • Shelley: I am a fan of non-conventional and or thrifted or vintage pieces that already exist and can be re-purposed or re-used. If you have to buy new, Accent Decor is our favorite around here.. I also hit up places like Homegoods, Tuesday Morning and of course if you have the budget Pottery Barn has some of the best modern/organic pieces.I also love Park Hill designs they supply Pottery Barn too. You will have to request a catalog. I tend to look more eclectic pieces and not too matchy but if you do need to stay more budget-friendly and coordinated I would go with your local floral supply wholesaler.
  • From Rebecca: Also, I’d like to learn more about your Las Vegas location (I live in Henderson though am from LA) Do you ever host events there? I’d like to come by the space to see the pretty flowers either way.
    • Yvonne: Las Vegas is a great branch and each year we host Art in Full Bloom. The event showcases art and flowers inspired by the art to raise money for charity. That typically happens in the fall so be sure to check it out. You can visit our blog to see pictures and information from past events. If you want to visit a branch and talk to someone on the team, please feel free to connect with them to set up a time. People do drop in, but I don’t recommend doing that for your first time as there are days & times that can be very crazy.
      Post link: https://www.mayesh.com/?s=art+in+full+bloom
      Link: https://www.mayesh.com/contact-us/locations/

 

MARKETING NEWS

  • From a retail flower shop: As a small independent florist who does not wish to take on the expense of rentals/set up/break down/per diem staff, etc. How do we market ourselves as a boutique wedding florist, doing smaller, more intimate weddings that focus on flowers and greenery more than draping fabrics and elaborate installations?
    • Yvonne: Ensure that your branding and marketing reflects the clients you want to attract and the type of work that you like to do – everything from your print, website, and social media. I visited the website and I noticed that you do not have a wedding section. So that is one thing that I would do immediately. You can add a landing page that talks about your designers, design philosophy, and wedding & event services/design, but most importantly has a form for potential clients to fill out to enter your “sales funnel”. Be sure to also include a portfolio showcasing your designs. Just be sure that all images reflect the type of work that you want to attract. I always recommend blogging for 2 reasons – SEO and having a central hub for your content. Even if you start by blogging 2 times per month, that is better than nothing. You can talk about local events and weddings, area trends, other local happenings & events, etc. This will help people find you and give you somewhere to point people to when you use social media. Once you’ve updated your website, but sure to also include content in your social media posts. I see that you have focused on the retail side of your business, so now you just need to mix in the other piece. I’m going to talk about hashtags next and that will be helpful to your social media marketing. Another step I would take would be to network with others in your community in the event industry. Agan, focus on cultivating relationships and partnerships with individuals and businesses whose ideal client is similar to yours. So I think these steps will get you started in your desired direction. Good luck!
  • From Roxanne: How do you find the trending hashtags for floral designers?
    Before I answer, does anyone watching want to share some of their favorite hashtags to utilize for their posts?

    • Yvonne: In general, top trending hashtags are great and if you have a post that fits perfectly with one, then great – be sure to include it. But as Roxanne, suggests, you want to use specific hashtags related to your business and then I would take it one step further and be sure to use hashtags related to your business and to your geographic area. The closed thing to a list would be to look at the hashtag list when you begin to start typing in a hashtag in IG’s search bar – Instagram will show you related/similar hashtags and how often they have been used.
      The best way to start creating a list of go-to hashtags is to think of specific topics. For example, if you are posting a wedding bouquet, you can use #bridalbouquet, #weddingbouquet, #weddingflowers, etc, but then you may want to add your target city in the mix #charlestonflorist #charlestonweddingflorist, #charlestonweddings, etc. The next thing I would do, it creates a list of hashtags that other people and competitors are using. Take a look at area influencers and maybe some of your top followers. Also, once you find some hashtags that you like, take a look at the feed and see what other hashtags are being used to get some ideas.
    • Here’s a great article from HubSpot about Instagram hashtags: https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/instagram-hashtags

If you think of new questions for our next show, you can post them in the comments here or use the contact form to send them to Yvonne.

Be sure to mark your calendar for August 14th at 10 am EST for the next Mornings with Mayesh – see you soon!

Mayesh Design Star Miami Workshop Recap

 

As we gear up for our third workshop of the year in Seattle, we’re taking a look back on our first workshop this past January in Miami! Now that it has officially been published on Botanical Brouhaha, we’re excited to share some more of the beautiful photos to give you a look into what our Curate & Create Workshop Tour with Kaylee Young really looks like.

Our Miami workshop was held at 255 Studio, a photography studio in the vibrant Wynwood Arts District that provided the perfect blank canvas for Kaylee to work with.

 


 

DAY ONE

 

The workshop kicked off with an evening networking event. Two of our product sponsors (Hosa & Alexandra Farms) stopped by to talk about their products while the students ate delicious appetizers from Food Guy Catering. Then Kaylee led the class in a mood boarding activity in an effort to help the students define their own, unique design styles and come into the next day with intention.

 

 


 

DAY TWO

 

The second day of the workshop focused on design. Kaylee walked the students through her entire process from order curation to design. The students were then given the opportunity to create their own centerpieces using the most amazing product from our sponsors.

The last piece of the workshop was a group installation, led by Kaylee and her design assistant, Jamie Heusser. Together they created a chuppah and aisleway installation with a variety of foliages and garden roses.

 

 

 

Workshop Credits:

 

Taught by Kaylee Young of Flourish by Kay
Photography: Nicole Clarey Photography
Videography: Talewind Visuals
Venue: 255 Miami Studio
Rentals: Elements & AccentsLavish Event Rentals
Catering: Food Guy Catering

 

Workshop Product Sponsors:

 

 


 

To learn more about our workshops and reserve your spot in one of the remaining three (Seattle, Santa Barbara or Salt Lake City), click here!

 

Mornings with Mayesh: June 2018

During June’s Mornings with Mayesh episode, Yvonne & Dave discuss the world of flowers. See a great selection of flowers that are available now and learn more about some great large blooms that are available each month. In addition, they answer some great audience questions like what are good subs for eucalyptus, providing an overview of how grading works, explaining why we stream on Facebook, how to update your category listing for Instagram to “florist”, and much more. Also, be sure to watch/listen to the entire show because at the end, Yvonne will discuss Instagram’s algorithm and what it means for you. Enjoy and don’t forget to send in your questions for our next show on July 10th!

 

Here is the podcast replay, video and show notes:

SHOW NOTES

FLOWER QUESTIONS

  • Fresh flowers straight from our cooler today and here is the link to latest flower 411:
  • Roxanne G Boerke: I’m based in Chicago. What is one go to large bloom by season? ie peonies for spring
    • Here are a few seasonal ideas for larger focal flowers by season:
      • Summer: Dahlias (Dave’s pick), Anthurium, Artichokes, Buddleia, Calla Lilies, China Mums, Eremurus, Eucomis, Gerberas, Giant Alliums, Giant Coxcomb Celosia, Giant Poppies, Ginger, Heliconia, Liles, Phalaenopsis stems, Protea, sunflowers.
      • Fall:  Chrysanthemum disbuds (Dave’s pick), Amaryllis, Anthuriums, Calla lilies, Cotton on the stem, Dahlias, Gerberas, Ginger, Giant Coxcomb Celosia, Heliconia, Kale, Lilies, Marigolds, Phalaenopsis stems, Peonies, Protea, Sunflowers.
      • Winter: Amaryllis (Dave’s pick), Anthurium, Calla Lilies, Cymbidium stems, Gerberas,  Giant Gloriosa from Japan, Giant Ranunculus from Japan, Ginger, Heliconia, Kale, Liles, Phalaenopsis stems, Peonies, Protea, Vanda stems.
      • Spring: Anthuriums (Dave’s pick), Artichokes, Banksias, Calla lilies, Giant Coxcomb Celosia, China Mums, French Tulips, Gerberas, Ginger, Heliconia, Kale, Lilies, Peonies, Phalaenopsis stems, Protea, Sunflowers & Vanda stems.
  • Don’t forget to check out our Mayesh Floral Meme Instagram Challenge that is happening right now: https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/mayeshfloralmeme/
  • Here’s the link to our Flower Guide: http://info.mayesh.com/flower-guide-offer
    • Be sure to download our ultimate flower guide. it is 12 month of flower availability lists in 1 handy document! It great to use for consultations, planning product palettes and for new employees to reference.
  • Kelly: What are some good subs for Euc?
    • Bay Laurel, olive foliage, purple acacia foliage, grevillea foliage, green nandina, nagi, camelia. Please be aware that from around late April through early June a lot of these greens start their new growth cycle and are too tender to cut. Eucalyptus can have brown to purple soft tips that wilt very quickly but due to their enormous demand, they are being harvested in this delicate state anyway.
  • Kelly: I’m having trouble understanding quality tiers on product and how to request higher grades on certain items. Can you explain?
    • Grading is used to indicate the stage at which a flower is cut (aka it’s open-ness) or to indicate the stem length (which in some cases will translate to a larger bloom head).  For instance, carnations are graded by “standard, select and fancy” which translates to short, medium & long stem length. Alstroemeria is graded by fancy, select and super select meaning short, medium & long stem length. Learning the dialogue used with different flowers will help you navigate the ordering process. Roses are graded by centimeters for their stem length.
    • Mayesh is known for our higher end “Luxe Blooms” procurement. We pride ourselves on carrying the best of the best.
    • Mayesh reps know their clients well and accommodate you based on your personal preferences and needs. For instance, most of our wedding and event clients only want the best! Tall sturdy stems, large blooms, in vogue colors and varieties and we are experts at making your installations truly magical.
    • We also offer more economical choices by keeping a well-stocked online inventory in our Mayesh market. On Mayesh market, you are buying full boxes of flowers so there is a bulk purchase discount on the cost. The quality is still excellent but geared more towards the frugal buyer by utilizing growers from all over the globe.
    • We are able to quickly assemble a purchase order “quote” with our best guess on pricing that can be e-mailed for your approval. This ensures you are in budget and are able to make alterations before the product is in transit. This saves everyone money in the long run by reducing excess inventory.
    • Always discuss the particulars with your sales rep including budget. We work hard to get you exactly what you need!

 

MARKETING NEWS

  • Heather: Why do you stream on FB instead of YouTube?
    • Mainly because I use BeLive.tv for this show, which gives me features that I need and BeLive connects to Facebook. Another reason, though, is that I find our community on Facebook to be more engaging with live content than on YouTube.
  • Charlene: How do you change your category listing for Facebook and Instagram?
    • Charlene saw that we are listed as a “Florist” and wants to know how to get that for her pages, right now her profile says “Artist”.
    • Instagram instructions state: “…if you want to change the category that appears on your Instagram business profile, you’ll need to update the category from the Facebook Page associated with your business.”
    • But that may not work for you and if it doesn’t try the following:
      • Reset your Instagram to a private account. Select the category you want on Facebook, like Florist (which is not listed in IG’s categories for some reason) and then switched your Instagram account back to a business profile and that should do the trick.
    • I sent Charlene the instructions, and here was her response “It worked! thank you so much for taking the time to help a stranger. I really appreciate it.”
  • Instagram Algorithm – With 800+ million users the newest algorithm allows you to see 90% of your friends posts and spend more time on the app according to the stats.
    • Post link: https://techcrunch.com/2018/06/01/how-instagram-feed-works/
    • IG reveal how their algorithm works and I thought it would be informative to review the main points.
      • Interest – IG predicts what you will care about based on rankings of what matters to you.
        • as you may know, if you watched past shows, is that I have dogs that includes a sharpei puppy, so I follow some doggie & sharpei pages and their posts always show up in my feed.
      • Timeliness or Recency – you will see posts that were created that day over posts created last week.
      • Relationship – how close are you to someone. For example, if you comment on someone’s post or if you are tagged in photos – Instagram will use relationships to figure out what to show you.
    • These are the 3 factors and nothing really surprising. It makes sense, but good to know. And beyond these factors, they use:
      • Frequency – how often you go into IG and figure out the best posts to show you since your last visit.
      • Following – the more people you follow the wider the breadth of people and pages IG will be using to pick from which means you will see less of any specific author. It’s common sense, but something to keep in mind and this is something that I feel like hinders me from being able to keep up with some designers that I like to follow.
      • Usage – how long are you spending on IG will affect what IG will show you – if you are on longer then IG will have to dive deeper to show you more content.
    • IG also revealed some myth busters!
      • IG does not hide posts in your feed – if you keep on scrolling you will eventually see everything from everyone you follow and get to the end. Has anyone seen “the end of the feed”?
      • Feeds do not favor photos or videos, but rather what you engage with the most. So if you watch lots of videos, then they will show you more videos.
        • Brands should have a good mix of both because your followers will have different preferences.
      • Also, IG doesn’t favor authors who use Stories, Lives, and other special features. But just because it doesn’t affect the newsfeed algorithm, there are still benefits to use the features to engage with your audience.
      • IG doesn’t give preference to business accounts or personal accounts. Just have the right account for your purpose – if you have a business then for me, it makes sense to have a business account.
      • A few months ago, I saw a bunch of content created around shadowbanning, but I never saw it happen or experienced it myself, but according to IG, shadowbanning is not a real thing. So use as many hashtags as you want, but again be smart, don’t be spammy, and make sure they relate to your posts. That is just good business.

 

If you think of new questions for our next show, you can post them in the comments here or use the contact form to send them to Yvonne.

Be sure to mark your calendar for July 10th at 10 am EST for the next Mornings with Mayesh – see you soon!

 

Mornings with Mayesh: Mood Boards & Debra Prinzing

Mornings with Mayesh

During Part I of this episode of Mornings with Mayesh, I demonstrated our custom Canva mood board templates that we created just for you. I review a very basic overview on how to update the templates with your business logo, inspiration text, images, and flower pictures. This easy to use app is great because you just need to upload your picture files or use the built-in stock photos. Another favorite tool that you can use to grab images, figure out color hex codes, and more, is SnagIt and I will give you a brief overview of how to use it.

To save a copy of the three inspiration boards to your own Canva account, click here.

For the second half of the show (Part II), our special guest, Debra Prinzing of SLOW Flowers, joined us. Watch or listen to learn more about Slow Flowers, American Flowers Week, the Slow Flower Summit and so much more. If you are interested in flower farming or just want to understand more about our the evolution of our industry, then you don’t want to miss this in-depth conversation.

 

Here is the podcast replay for Part II of the show. Part I is so visual that a podcast would not have made sense.

 

 

 

SHOW NOTES

 

PART I: MOOD BOARDS & INSPIRATION BOARDS

  • Demo Canva mood boards.https://www.canva.com/mayesh
    • NOTE: I realized after the live demo that you cannot use our design as a template directly from Canva, so I created live links for you to use and create a copy of the templates to your Canva account. Please visit the following link to get the links emailed to you: http://info.mayesh.com/mood-boards
  • We recently just published 3 mood board templates created specifically for you and your floral business.
  • These mood boards/inspiration boards/vision boards are perfect for planning flowers for weddings, corporate events, baby showers and everything else in between.
  • Another tool that my team loves, SnagIt

PART II: SPECIAL GUEST – DEBRA PRINZING

Today, we have a special and talented guest, Debra Prinzing. You may know Debra, as she is the creator of SlowFlowers.com, which is a free directory that helps consumers find florists, designers, studios and farms that supply American grown flowers. But did you know that she is also an award-winning author and speaker? Debra has written 10 books, contributes to many top publications, and is a wonderful speaker as you will soon see and someone that inspires me in my own floral career!

Here is her favorite quote is from Beverley Nichols, “…surely, if you are privileged to own a plot of earth, it is your duty, both to God and man, to make it beautiful.”

  1. Do you want me to start by telling everyone about what is SLOW FLOWERS?
  2. How did you become so obsessed about local, seasonal and sustainable flowers in the first place?
  3. What have you seen in terms of changing consumer attitudes about local and American grown flowers?
  4. What have you seen in terms in terms of changing focus on product sourcing among florists, retailers, wedding/event designers?
  5. What kind of metrics back up these conclusions?
  6. You’ve published an annual Slow Flowers forecast each January for the past four years. How do you track trends and/or predictions that influence the Slow Flowers community?
  7. Are you looking for suggestions? How can people share their ideas/predictions with you?
  8. You produce a lot of content — from your podcast and blog to print and digital stories for Florists’ Review. Tell us about your floral journalism? What gets you excited about writing or interviewing someone for a story?
  9. You have two big events coming up in late June. Tell us about American Flowers Week first — what is it and how can people get involved?
  10. What are you most excited about with this year’s American Flowers Week?
  11. Last year you started the Slow Flowers SUMMIT — tell us what that is?
  12. Who are some of your guests — and what’s got you excited about the event?
  13. How can people get involved in Slow Flowers? Where can they plug in?
  14.  Are you a floral designer yourself?
  15. Tell me something that you are obsessed with right now that is floral related?

Where can we go to find out more information about Slow Flowers and your other projects that you have going on? http://www.debraprinzing.com/

 

if you think of new questions for our next show, you can post them in the comments here or use the contact form to send them to Yvonne.

Be sure to mark your calendar for May 29th at 10 am EST for the next Mornings with Mayesh featuring special guests, Greg Campbell and Erick New, co-owners of Garden District who traveled to specialty farms throughout the U.S. and abroad to create, Florists to the Field, a stunning coffee table book that was recently published.

MDS Seattle Workshop Vendor Feature: Metropolist

 

Guys! We’re so excited that we were able to add an extra Design Star workshop in Seattle with Kaylee Young, and we wanted to share the exciting news that we officially have a venue! The workshop will be held at Metropolist in SODO on July 16th & 17th. Here’s a little information about the space:

 

Metropolist is housed in the historic Ederer Building on 1st Avenue South. Built in 1919, the Ederer Crane building was used to manufacture large-scale cranes for construction projects around the area. You will discover one of the cranes remains in our space and adds an industrial and urban vibe to events and parties.

Metropolist is fully customizable, making it an ideal location for a Seattle wedding, celebration or company event. Metropolist evokes the dramatic effect of an urban industrial warehouse with 14 foot walls and vaulted 25 foot ceilings, floor to ceiling windows, exposed piping overhead, warm and bright wood floors.

 

Metropolist has held many beautiful weddings and styled shoots, one of which was recently featured on Magnolia Rouge! Check out some images of the space and some gorgeous events they have hosted…

 

 


 

 

Design Star Seattle Workshop Venue Metropolist

 

Design Star Seattle Workshop Venue Metropolist

Photo: @whiskersandwillow 

 

Design Star Seattle Workshop Venue Metropolist

 

Design Star Seattle Workshop Venue Metropolist

Above two photos: @omalleyphotographers

 

Design Star Seattle Workshop Venue Metropolist Photo: @bluerosepictures

 


 

Save your seat today!

 

WORKSHOP TICKETS

 

Mornings with Mayesh: April 2018

Mornings with Mayesh: April 2018

We covered some great content during Aprils’s Mornings with Mayesh show. During Part I, Dave, Shelley, and I talk about some of the amazing products that are available now and answered your flower questions. The discussion included: exciting filler flowers, Flannel Flower, using Pieris Japonica in bouquets, greens/pods for boho weddings, attaching/installing flowers to a tree, tools to help book wedding clients, and more.

For the second half of the show (Part II), our special guest, Alison Ellis of Real Flower Business, joined us to discuss minimums – how to set them, when to raise them & more. Enjoy and keep on scrolling down for the show notes.

 

Here are the podcast replays – Part I and Part II:

 

PART I SHOW NOTES

 

FLOWER QUESTIONS

 

What is exciting in the world of flowers?

  • Latest flower 411: https://www.mayesh.com/flower-411-april-2018/
  • Monthly availability list: https://www.mayesh.com/flower-availability/ 
  • It’s a heat wave out there! And we’ve got some hot stuff to show you today!
  • Domestic Snowball viburnum from Oregon has arrived and is in Mayesh coolers across the country. A big fluffy fun filler or focal flower BUT it won’t be around long so grab it while it’s hot!
  • Californian Boronia has just come into season and it is truly a super fragrant pop of hot pink color that everyone loves.
  • Giant coxcomb celosia from Holland is back in abundance and comes in all the bright jewel tones we love. Just look at the size of these guys.
  • Domestic Lilac is making it’s short but sweet debut available now from California and will bloom its way north along the west coast for the next few weeks.
  • Dicentra or Bleeding hearts are Dutch Imports right now but look at how cute this is…
  • From Penny – What are some new awesome different fillers that is not gyp??
    • It is easy to get in a rut using the same flowers as fillers but there are a lot of options both old and new available now.
    • Some old fave’s are asters like solidago and montecasino but thanks to growers hybridizing larger varieties we have these giant mardi gras asters and golden glory solidago which look like they are on steroids.
    • Check out this twist on queen annes lace, chocolate lace, it goes from cream to mauve to brown tones.
    • When you think of snowberries you usually think fall BUT these beauties are seasonal in Chile and being imported to us right now.
    • Astilbe is super popular right now, as is astrantia. Both are delicate with a feminine vibe that goes perfectly in wedding work.
    • California riceflower is blooming now and a perfect pop of color.
    • Last but not least, Thlaspi aka Penny Crest… I thought I’d finish with this cool textural Penny Crest to thank Penny for asking some great questions for the show this week! A relative to the Mustard family, it was introduced to the United states in the 1700’s and is found in almost every state.
    •  I also love Boronia heather, wax flower calycinia and eriosteman and pieris japonica.
  • From Penny – We are losing our gerbera daisy growers to another crop…. is the future of the gerbera going to be all imports??? 
    • It’s not just gerberas! Our ever-evolving political climate is making it more and more difficult for some local growers to stay lucrative without changing their business models. It is unfortunate that a lot of what used to be domestic crops are now being grown in other countries where the overhead is lower. The plus side is a more consistent year-round supply and a huge increase in novelty colors and varieties for our market in the USA.
  • From Jayme: My question is regarding Flannel flower, does Mayesh ever have them? Do they import from Australia?
    • DAVE: Flannel flower or Actinotus is available sporadically throughout the year. Mayesh imports this flower from Japan via the Naniwa flower auction starting in early December through Early May. Last year it was also sourced through the Dutch auction in Aalsmeer in May & June then again in September & October. As with any novelty flowers, Flannel flowers availability is inconsistent making them a true gem when they are available.
    • Shelley: Fun fact: this flower is also known as Edelweiss and is native to Austria…if you remember The Sound of Music this is the little flower the song references..Woops I stand corrected. Flannel flower: Acitnotus helianthi are Flannel Flower or sometimes called Australian Edelweiss is a different genus than Austrian Edelweiss which is Leontopodium. My apologies for the misinformation! We are getting that now and it is coming from Japan.

FLOWER CARE

    • From Kristina: Do you know how Pieris Japonica holds up in bouquets and is it available right now?
      • Dave: Pieris goes in and out of season depending on country of origin throughout the year. They tend to shed once the blooms are fully open. A cool use for these is when they are harvested in bud form eliminating the shedding effect. Their natural blooming season varies from year to year based on weather & temperature. This year we saw good production February through April. It will gap for a bit and then we will start to get it in budded form from New Zealand around June. Sporadic production will continue July through October.
      • Shelley: yes it does and it is a beautiful textural accent.

 

FLOWER DESIGN

  • From Penny: Are you finding more different greens/pods for trending boho weddings??
    • Shelley: yes, actually drieds have made a big comeback for weddings and we are seeing more of our florists buy product to save and dry. Seed pods from Eucalyptus, scabiosa pods, even dried poppy pods. Tumbleweeds, dried palm branches and lots of unusual seed pods like old man’s beard are fun alternatives
  • From Rebecca: What are your tips for doing flower application directly on an element like a tree?
    • Shelley: First of all, always make sure you have permission from the venue to decorate the tree. I find doing the least invasive techniques work the best.Hanging a garland by using zip ties or using a decorative ribbon to hand a wreath or cage also works. you should never nail into a tree unless the venue already has one in place

 

FLOWER BUSINESS

  • From Summer: What are your favorite “tools” for booking potential bridal clients?  
    • Shelley: Nothing beats good word of mouth and referrals but sometimes that just doesn’t get you enough business when you are new. I always connect with venues and send an arrangement and card and ask for an appointment with the banquet manager. Let them know you are interested in their business. Churches are also a good place to get your foot in the door. Most have a preferred vendors list. I good church coordinator on your side can net you a ton of referrals. As always you will have to put yourself out there as there is competition in your demographic. But being persistent will pay off. Asked to be invited to any meet and greets or bridal shows that these venues may have.If you already have spoken to a bride and would like to book her business, ALWAYS answer emails and follow up quickly with a proposal. I have booked many weddings just because I followed through with the client and showed them I wanted their business. I can’t tell you how many times I have heard from brides who made their first appointment with me just because I responded to their initial inquiry…so many florists have auto-response set emails or don’t reply at all. If you want the business, show them! And while we are on the subject of auto-response emails like” thank you for your inquiry but we are currently out working on a wedding or we are traveling” or whatever your excuse is, and you are just too busy to answer..it is a little frustrating to potential clients. Get thee an assistant or intern to promptly respond to emails. You will come off as professional and on it! This is so refreshing to a bride, especially when she has received several of these replies already.  this alone may be a deciding factor for her..because she knows you are attentive from the get-go and won’t be receiving these the entire time you are working with her.
    • Yvonne:

 

Part II

SPECIAL GUEST – ALISON ELLIS

 

Alison Ellis is a floral designer & educator that teaches florists how to embrace the business side of the business so they can make more money and take control of their future. She’s been working in the floral industry for 24 years; after spending 8 years training in half a dozen flowers shops, she opened a home-based floral business in 2002, which focuses almost exclusively on weddings.

Alison’s business tips & teachings can be found at realflowerbusiness.com, which is listed in the top 40 of the “Best Flower Blogs on the Planet”. She’s been featured on FlirtyFleurs.com and is currently a regular business contributor to Florists’ Review Magazine.

She has a wealth of knowledge to share with you and I’m so happy to have her on today’s show!

 

  • Questions from Arbella: I know you got started with several restaurant accounts. How did that work? Did you have 2 sets of bud vases that you would just switch out? Or did you design on site during times the restaurant wasn’t open? And do you have any tips on how you built those relationships?
  • Question from Carie: Lately I have had more brides wanting me to do a mock-up of their wedding flowers so they will be able to see what they will look like prior to the wedding.  When I tell them that I charge for this service they are appalled and decide against it. I haven’t lost any clients over this yet, but wondered how other florists handle these type of people and are there florists out there that do this for free??  
  • Why should florists set a minimum?
  • If they’re just starting out, should you start with a minimum?
  • How do you determine what you minimum should be?
  • When should you raise your minimum?
  • Should you post your minimum on your website?

 

Where can everyone find out more about you and Real Flower business?  https://realflowerbusiness.com/

 

If you think of new questions, you can post them in the comments here or use the contact form to send them to Yvonne.

Be sure to mark your calendar for April 24th at 10 am EST for a special Mornings with Mayesh featuring Gretchen Sell from Design Master.

 

 


The Mayesh Experience

The Mayesh Experience

We offer you high-quality wholesale flowers to fulfill your every day & event design needs along with knowledgeable salespeople to help you every step of the way no matter where you are nationwide. Not only do we offer you great products & services, but we strive to provide resources and connections to inspire!

Learn more about: Mayesh Luxe Blooms, Mayesh Market, Mayesh Pulls, Destination Events, Commitment to Education, Mayesh Gives Back, and more!

DOWNLOAD GUIDE HERE

Why You Should be Using Instagram Stories

Instagram Stories

 

So you’re on Instagram, but so are 700 million other people, with 25 million of those being businesses. How can you make yourself stand out in a sea of literally millions of other Instagrammers? (Yes, it’s a word, we checked. Merriam-Webster is more than likely adding it to the dictionary as you read this.) One word: Stories. You’ve most likely watched Instagram Stories from some of your favorite ‘grammers, be it other florists, bloggers or friends. And you’ve probably loved them, right? Instagram Stories are a great way to not only be seen on Instagram, but to connect more personally with clients as well.

 

According to Instagram, one-third of the most viewed Stories on the platform are from businesses – a huge number when you consider business profiles only make up about 28% of the total users on Instagram. And even better news, two-thirds of visits to business profiles are users that don’t already follow that business on Instagram. With 300 million Instagram users viewing Stories daily, that’s a lot of opportunities to get your content before the eyes of potential customers, and current customers that you want to keep coming back for more of your floral magic.

 

Instagram Stories

 

We know, we know, we’re total data geeks and we just threw a lot of numbers at you! But aside from all of the technological reasons (changing algorithms, engagement, etc.) there are so many other ways and reasons to be using Stories for your business. So now that you’re on board, we want to share some of the different ways you can use them to your benefit and achieve the engagement you need to run a successful business in the age of Social Media!

 


 

One of our most asked questions when it comes to Instagram is whether or not to share BTS (behind-the-scenes) and personal images on your business feed. Well, when answering that question, there are many things to consider. The Instagram feed has now become your portfolio… brides will scroll through yours and decide within SECONDS if they like your work and want to reach out to you. And with all of the beautifully curated feeds out there, you do want to compete with those and make sure yours is consistent and representative of your brand. However, with all of those beautifully curated feeds, how do YOU stand out? To a potential bride or customer who doesn’t necessarily look at flowers and weddings all day, it can be overwhelming to differentiate between all the pretty! Well, Stories are a great way to set yourself apart and show the world a little bit about the designer behind the flowers.

 

I don’t know about you, but when the time comes for me to choose all of the vendors for my wedding, I not only want to love their work, but I want to love them. Stories is a space to share your personality – if you’re a big goofball in real life, show us! Are you witty and sarcastic and have an opinion on just about everything? You bet there’s going to be someone out there who connects with that. Instagram users and potential clients love seeing little pieces of your life outside of work – it helps them feel like they know you even if in reality, you’ve never met.

 

Stories are also a great place to share some BTS of your day-to-day life as a florist… the “ugly” stuff. We know that gorgeous centerpiece on that carefully curated tablescape didn’t just appear… show us how it got there! The process can be just as interesting for your clients or fellow vendors, and as an added bonus, it shows them just how much hard work goes into being a florist, something people don’t always realize! On top of potential clients, this is also a great way to network and connect with other vendors in the industry, making “Instagram friends” if you will, who want to work with you in the future and will direct their clients to you. Win-win!

 

Instagram Stories

 

Okay, so let’s quickly recap the WHY’S of using Stories:

 

  1. To show off that sparkling (or goofy) personality of yours
  2. To show your process and a little BTS of your life as a florist
  3. To increase engagement on your content
  4. To network with industry vendors

 

So now that you have a little more insight into some of the benefits of using Stories, here are some tips, tricks and how-to’s to achieving that.

 


 

Instagram Live

 

Going live can be super intimidating, but Instagram has made it so easy that it’s really not that big of a deal! We’ve seen florists use Live videos in a number of ways… from live design demonstrations to Q+A’s (both personal and business related), Live stories are a great way to interact in real time and allow your followers to ask questions for you to answer right then and there. If you’re not already following Ponderosa & Thyme, she uses Instagram Live all the time and is one of our favorites to tune into.

 

Links

 

If your Instagram is a business account (which it should be) one of our most utilized features is the good ‘ole “Swipe Up!” for links. Whether you want to share new content you’ve posted to your blog or website, or you just want to direct customers/brides to your contact page, this feature is exclusive to business profiles and sees really high engagement. When we started linking our new blog posts on Stories, we saw a huge increase in link opens and people reading and commenting on our blogs, and it makes complete sense with how convenient it is – a simple swipe and they’re right where you want them.

 

Polls

 

In the most general sense, polls can be a great way to find out WHAT your followers are interested in seeing. If you’re still struggling with determining what to post on your feed and/or Stories, do a little crowdsourcing!

Polls can also be used as fun little ways to interact with your followers, even if you’re not *really* looking for an answer. For example, posting two arrangements and asking them which they like best. Or maybe you DO want an answer! Your followers’ input could be just what you need to answer the important questions in life…. like blush vs. millennial pink 😉

 

Story Highlights

 

It’s both a blessing and a curse that Stories only last 24 hours… but that all changed when Instagram introduced Highlights. If you went on an Insta-Rant (not yet a word, but it probably should be) about pricing and you want everyone to hear what you had to say, make it a Highlight! You can really use them for anything – a portfolio of your best work, a BTS of an event from start to finish, upcoming events or workshops – and you can add to individual highlights even after you’ve already posted the original one. If you need a little inspiration, Shean Strong has some great ones – from “Five Fun Facts” to our personal favorite, “Driving with Shean,” the possibilities are endless.

 

Instagram Stories

 

Fight the Algorithm

 

We’ve all heard about the changing algorithms, and because of them you might sometimes notice less engagement (likes & comments) on your posts. One way to help guide followers to new posts on your feed is to use Stories! Many bloggers & Influencers do this by screenshotting their feed and literally just saying “NEW POST!” as a way to direct them there and increase engagement. And in doing research for this blog, we learned that there might be some new features on the way to make sharing new posts even easier… stay tuned!

 

Insights & Tutorials

 

We’ve talked a lot about engagement and insights and all this technical stuff – but what does it all mean?! To find out how to analyze all this data, check out this article from Social Media Examiner… they can explain things a bit better than we can 😉

And if you’re looking for some more technical help on how to use all of the great (and constantly evolving) features, check out these two helpful visual guides to help you master your Insta-Story game!

The Preview App: New Features Instagram 2018

Hootsuite: How to Use Instagram Stories

 


 

If you weren’t already using Stories, we hope you’ve convinced you by now! If you have any questions or comments, or have discovered another creative use of them, share with us in the Comments below!

 

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