Author Archive

Flower 411: April 2019

Just Starting

Albuca – white & yellow – import

Berzelia – local

Bleeding Hearts – import

Boronia – peak season

Calendula – orange & yellow

Cirsium Thistle – white, pink, lavender – import

Cottage yarrow – limited colors – local – limited amounts

Dyed Brown everything – import and local

Eremurus – import

Forget Me Not – blue

Gallardia

Geum

Hybrid Delph – local

Jasmine flowering

Lilac Local – extremely limited

Pea Orchid – (it’s a filler)

Plum foliage

Poppy pods

Scadoxus/Heamanthus – import $$$$$

Scilla Peruvian

Spirea

Star of Bethlehem – orange – local – limited

Strawflower – white, pink, purple, orange – local

Sweet Pea – import (not Japan)

Tweedia – short – local – limited

Nigella – local

Viburnum snowball

Available

Alstroemeria – import

Acacia Knifeblade Silver

Amaranthus Hanging – green – local (short tails)

Amaryllis – import

Anemone – local – peak season

Anthurium – import

Anthurium – red – Hawaii

Artichokes – baby – red & green

Artichokes large – red

Astilbe White – import

Astrantia – import

Aster Matsumoto

Aussie Pine

Bay leaf

Begonia Leaves – import – only advance notice

Bells – import

Bells local – Winter Bells – gaps between blooms

Bleached Dried Flowers – assorted – import

Blooming branch novelty – halesia, kerria, cercis, saskatoon flower (Oregon) Cherry white & pink

Bouvardia – import

Brodea – import

Calla – large

Calla – mini

Camellia – CA grown

Carnations

Chamomile

Cherry Blossom

Chocolate Lace

Clematis – no white – Dutch only

Clematis pods – (puff balls) – import

Cotton

Coxcomb – import

Cornflower – blue – limited

Craspedia

Cymbidium

Cymbidium – mini

Daffodil – novelty – local – peak season

Dahlias – basic colors: burgundy, café, orange, pink, red, white, purple, coral

Daisy Killian – white

Delphinium Belladonna – dark blue & light blue

Delphinium Hybrid tall – import

Dendrobium

Dianthus Green – import & local

Dianthus Gypsy – all colors – peak season

Dogwood branches – budded green no color yet

Dusty Miller

Echeveria

Eucalyptus Silver Dollar

Eucalyptus Baby Blue

Eucalyptus True Blue

Eriostemon – flowering

Eryngium – import

Euphorbia flowering – Dutch

Euphorbia Wolfnii & Dogeye

Freesia – local & import

French Tulips – local & import – peak season

Fritillaria – all types – import

Garden Roses

Gardenias

Genestra – local & import    

Geranium – chocolate & peppermint

Gerbera – assorted – peak season

Gloriosa – short – import

Gloriosa – XXL – Japan – $$$

Grass Bunny Tail   

Green Mist

Heather – pink

Hellebores – local & import

Hyacinth – local & import

Hydrangea – import

Hypericum

Iris

Ixia – import

Ivy

Kale – frilled – white & purple

Kale – large

Kale – mini

Kangaroo Paw – import & local

Kiwi Vine

Larkspur

Lavender – English or French

Leucadendron – green, safari sunset, jester, goblet, goldstrike, salignum

Leucocoryne – import

Leucospermum – orange, yellow, red, novelty – peak season

Lichen covered branches – limited

Lily Asiatic

Lily LA Hybrid

Lily Oriental

Lisianthus – local & import

Limonium – import

Magnolia tulip budded branches

Mokara

Muscari – import

Myrtle Green

Nerine – import

Olive branches

Orlaya

Oncidium

Pampas grass – dried only

Peony – import

Pepperberry hanging

Phalaenopsis

Phlox – import

Pieris Buds

Plumosa fern – painted

Poppy Icelandic

Poppy Boom Boom

Poppy Big Boy

Protea King – pink only

Protea Pin Cushion – peak season

Protea Pink Ice – peak season

Protea Pink Mink

Protea Warratah – red – import

Queen Anne’s Lace – chocolate & white

Ranunculus – local  peak season

Ranunculus butterfly – local – peak season

Roses

Rosemary

Safari Sunset

Sage green

Scabiosa pods – Dutch only

Scented geranium

Scilla – import

Smilax Southern – Florida only

Snowberries – import

Solidago

Spray Roses

Star of Beth – import

Statice – seafoam & sinuata

Stock

Succulents

Sunflowers – dark center & red tint – (sunbeam & mahogany not available)

Sunflower – mini

Sweet Pea – Japan  – almost done

Sumac w/ cones  

Tillandsia

Tinted foliages

Trachelium – import

Tropical flowers – ask

Tulips – single

Tulips – double

Tulips – French

Tulips – frilled

Tulips – parrot

Tulips – On The Bulb – limited but available

Tweedia – import

Vanda

Veronica – import only

Viburnum Tinus – import only

Victorian Birch

Waxflower – local

Limited

Banksia – limited

Chocolate cosmos – Japan only

Eucalyptus Seeded – cupped only

Eucalyptus Gunni

Eucalyptus Parvifolia

Maidenhair fern

Nigella – blue flower only

Limited

Protea King – white

Protea – white

Protea Red Baron

Smilax – low production for 6 weeks

Stephanotis blooms

Sterling Range – limited

Thyme

Finished/ Not Available

Acacia foliage – purple feather

Acacia foliage – green

Acacia flower – yellow

Agonis

Amaranthus – upright – all colors

Aussie Bells

Calycina

Camelia – Oregon

Celosia feather – local

Chocolate Cosmos – local

Delph Bella – white

Eucalyptus pods – Silver Bells

Eucalyptus Regular Seeded

Eucalyptus Gumdrop

Eucalyptus Bonsai

Explosion Grass

Festival bush – import    

Fruiting Branches Blackberries

Gladiola – green

Gomphrena

Grapevine fresh

Heather – white

Limonium Emile

Lunaria

Marigolds

Magnolia tips – Florida

Millet

Paperwhites – local

Pomegranates

Privet berry

Raspberry

Rain Tree pods

Rose Hips

Stephanotis vines

Talloberry

Viburnum Berries – limited

Yarrow

FTD World Cup 2019

At the beginning of this month, Philadelphia was host to one of the biggest floral events of the year – the Interflora World Cup. We sent our very own Mayesh Miami Sales Rep Steven Watkins to get in on the action and report back on his experience. Read on to get a peek into the incredible event that is the Interflora World Cup!


FTD World Cup, WOW! What an experience, thousands of  floral enthusiasts from around the globe descended on the Philadelphia Flower Show for three days of  floral competition at its highest level.  Overall, 23 global competitors competed for the coveted title of World Champion, throughout this three-day event.

DAY ONE

Part 1 – The first theme being Harmony in Architecture, the challenge was to have a 70/30 mix of botanicals to structure in a minimal two hour time limit, and to make sure that the smallest details had meaning and purpose in their architectural arrangement. Each designer created their structure prior to arrival at the competition, some as large as 7 ft by 7 ft. This left two hours to complete all florals, and what a whirlwind! Twenty-three competitors to view as they worked with the most luxurious flowers globally available, building their works of art, adding layer after layer until time ran out! Twenty-three works of art, as different as the creators who made them.

Part 2 – The second theme was Hand Tied Bouquet, Strength of Color.  The competitors were challenged with creating a bouquet that speaks to an observer and demonstrates how color and light are inseparable. Additionally, the bouquet must be able to be held in one hand. All of this in just ninety minutes – flowers and hands flying, exquisite bouquets created, some with armatures, some without, tight and clustered or loose and airy -the styles as different as the countries the designers came from. Dreamy pastel colors to hot and bright, every flower had its day, from carnations to luxe vanda orchids in gorgeous color stories. The competition was strong, with everyone putting their skills to the test!  At the end of day one, the crowd was as exhausted as the competitors, complete sensory overload, so much to take in, so many design styles to evaluate and consider, what a tough choice this was going to be.

DAY TWO

Part 1 – To kick off day two, the theme was Table for Two – The Power of Flowers. The challenge was to create a complete table setting for two that interpreted life changing transformation through love and hope. The power of love to be featured through flowers and the design should stimulate at least four of the five senses. With only two hours to complete this monumental task, everyone had laser focus and steadily worked their way through the designs. From strongly architectural to completely whimsical, each table for two expressed the theme, love and emotion through flowers. Expectations were high and everyone was thrilled by the outcomes of the designs, amazingly strong competition, although leaders were certainly starting to emerge from the previous days competition as well as the morning session of day two.

Part 2 – A “surprise” basket containing American Grown Flowers, which seemed to throw a few designers for a loop, moments of hesitation and then they were off. With just ninety minutes to go, some narrowed the flower choices to a minimum, others using every item.  Containers and stands provided by a sponsor were used in a variety of ways, with many people turning the stands on their sides and using them as a base to build arrangements with stems in plates of water, others taking the more traditional floral foam route, building creations in concrete containers.  This challenge really separated the field and everyone was excited to attend the Semifinal Reception dinner to discover who would be moving on, from a field of twenty-three it would soon be narrowed to 10.

DAY THREE

By the third day, the competitors had been narrowed to 10, with the cream of the crop rising to the top. This morning’s challenge was another surprise basket with a two-hour time limit, designers choice. For those in the crowd who had not attended the Semifinal Reception, it was a mad dash around the hall, checking to see if their favorite designers had made it through to battle on today. Although everyone was a star, unfortunately some had been knocked out due to flowers dying, and structures falling, making it impossible to stay in the competition with such a strong field.

At this point, at least in my mind, there were two people who clearly stood out from the others – these two would go on to win the night along with Second Runner Up, Tamas Mezoffy of Hungary.  Congratulations to Bart Hassam of Australia, whose bold, clean, architectural, east meets west designs won him the title of World Champion, and to First Runner Up  Natalia Zhizhko of Russia, whose elegant, feminine, whimsical designs were as delicately beautiful as Mr. Hassam’s bold architecture.

For a World Cup newbie like myself, I am now truly enamored by competition floral, and certainly intend to make a spot on my calendar (as should everyone interested in the Art of Flowers) every four to six years to attend what can only be considered the pinnacle of floral design.

Foam-Free Floral Arch

 

In this episode of A Minute With Mayesh we discuss techniques for creating a completely foam-free floral arch. Don’t forget to tune in to Mornings With Mayesh every month, and check out past episodes here!

 


 

 

 

 

Flower 411: March 2019

 

Spring is right around the corner, and with it, great spring flowers become available again! Keep reading to check out what beautiful blooms are available this month!

 

Just Starting

 

Berzelia Local

Cherry Blossom

Eriostemon buds flowering

Euphorbia Wolfnii

Jasmine flowering

Scilla Peruvian

Tulip Parrot Black

 

 

Available

 

Alstroemeria – import

Amaranthus Hanging – green – local (short tails)

Amaryllis – import

Anemone – local

Anthurium – import

Artichokes – baby – red & green limited

Artichokes large – red

Ascelpias Pods

Astilbe White – import

Astrantia – import

Aster Matsumoto

Aussie Pine

Bay leaf

Begonia Leaves – import – only advance notice

Bells – import

Bells local – Winter Bells – gaps between blooms

Bleached Dried Flowers – assorted – import

Blossom – white

Bouvardia – import
Calla – large

Calla – mini

Camellia

Carnations

Chamomile

Chocolate lace

Clematis – Dutch only – no white

Cotton

Coxcomb – import

Cornflower – blue, choco, pink

Craspedia

Cymbidium

Cymbidium – mini

Dahlias – basic colors: burgundy, café, orange, pink, red, white

Daisy Killian – white

Dawn Viburnum Blooming branch

Delphinium Belladonna – dark blue & light blue

Delphinium Hybrid tall – import

Dendrobium

Dianthus Green – import & local

Dianthus Gypsy (burgundy limited)

Dusty Miller

Echeveria

Eriostemon- flowering

Eryngium – import

Euc Pods – silver bells

Euphorbia flowering – Dutch

Freesia – local & import

Garden Roses

Gardenias

Genestra – local & import

Geranium – chocolate & peppermint

Gerbera – assorted

Gloriosa – short – import

Gloriosa – XXL – Japan – $$$

Grass Bunny Tail (sub Canary Grass)

Green Mist

Hellebores – local & import

Hyacinth – import

Hydrangea – import

Hypericum

Iris – dark blue

Ivy

Jasmine Vine – flowering

Kale – frilled – white & purple

Kale – large

Kale – Mini

Kangaroo Paw – import

Kiwi Vine

Larkspur

Lavender – English or French

Leucadendron green, safari sunset, jester, goblet, goldstrike, salignum

Leucospermum – orange, yellow, red, novelty

Lily Asiatic

Lily LA Hybrid

Lily Oriental

Lisianthus – import

Limonium – import

Magnolia tulip budded branches

Maidenhair fern

Mokara

Muscari – import

Nerine – import

Olive branches

Orlaya

Oncidium

Pampas grass – dried only

Peony – import

Phalaenopsis

Phlox – import

Pieris Buds

Plumosa fern – painted

Poppy Icelandic

Poppy Boom Boom

Poppy Big Boy

Protea King – pink only

Protea Pin Cushion

Protea Pink Ice

Protea Pink Mink

Queen Anne’s Lace – chocolate & white

Ranunculus – local

Ranunculus butterfly – local & Japan

Roses

Rosemary

Safari Sunset

Sage green

Scabiosa – import

Scabiosa pods – Dutch only

Scented geranium

Smilax Bags (CA)

Smilax Southern

Solidago

Spirea – Japan

Spray Roses

Spring Bouquet Viburnum

Snapdragons

Star of Beth – import

Statice – seafoam & sinuata

Stock

Succulents

Sunflowers – dark center & red tint – sunbeam & mahogany not available

Sunflower – mini

Sweet Pea – Japan

Sumac w/ cones

Tinted foliages

Trachelium – import

Tropical flowers – ask

Tulips – single

Tulips – double

Tulips – French

Tulips – frilled

Tulips – parrot

Tweedia – import

Vanda

Veronica – import only

Viburnum Tinus – import only

Victorian Birch

Waxflower – local

 

 

Limited

 

Alchemilla mollis

Artichoke – green – large

Banksia – very limited

Camellia – Oregon

Chocolate cosmos – Japan only

Delphinium Hybrid short – local – limited due to weather

Heather White – limited

Nigella – blue flower only

Poppy Pods

Protea – white

Protea Red Baron

Sterling Range – very limited

Thyme

Viburnum Berries – limited

 

 

Finished/ Not Available

 

Acacia foliage – purple feather

Agapanthus – Dutch

Agonis

Amaranthus – upright all colors

Aussie Bells – lavender only

Blackberry

Boronia

Calycina

Celosia feather – local

Chocolate Cosmos – local

Cirsium Thistle – light pink

Delph Bella – white

Euc pods – Silver Bells

Explosion Grass

Festival bush – import

Gladiola – green

Gomphrena

Grapevine fresh

Heather Pink

Limonium Emile

Lunaria

Marigolds

Millet

Paperwhites – local

Pepperberry – hanging & upright

Plum foliage

Pomegranates

Privet berry

Raspberry

Rain Tree pods

Rice Flower

Rose Hips

Stephanotis

Stephanotis vines

Strawflower

Talloberry

Yarrow

 

 

 

Calla Lily Bouquet

 

In this episode of A Minute With Mayesh we share our advice on how to successfully add calla lilies to a bouquet.

Don’t forget to tune in to Mornings With Mayesh every month, and check out past episodes here!

 


 

 

 

Dried Fruits & Vegetables

 

In this episode of A Minute With Mayesh we talk about how to dry your own fruits and veggies to use in arrangements.

 

We post new episodes of Mornings With Mayesh every month, check them out here!

 


 

 

 

Are Wire Services Worth It?

 

In this episode of A Minute With Mayesh we discuss wire services, and whether or not your business should be utilizing them.

 

We post new episodes of AMWM every month, check them out here!

 


 

 

 

Getting Customers to Re-Order

 

In this episode of A Minute With Mayesh we discuss best practices to ensure online customers re-order from your business. Don’t forget to tune in to our live episodes each month, and check out past episodes here!

 


 

 

 

How To Organize Your Floral Wedding Folder

 

Ryan O’Neil of Curate returns with another addition to his blog series – read on for his best advice on keeping all those wedding details organized!

 


 

Lauren and Rachel at Sweet Root Village were up to their ears in wedding folders. Each time a client wanted to make the smallest of changes, they had to pull out the giant folder, scribble in the changes, and then close them up again until the client would reach out to ask for more changes… five minutes later (at least, that’s how it seemed).

 

Sound familiar? Most of the wedding and event florists the Curate team talks to every day can relate to Lauren and Rachel’s story. And many of them share how they’ve found the most random of notes in their folders–including their team’s lunch order.

Simply put, wedding folders tend to get messy VERY quick. But a simple checklist can make a world of difference in organizing your wedding folders. Here’s what we’ve found to work well:

 

  • Wedding Folder Cover Sheet: This should include an image of the happy couple, the date of the wedding, and a checklist-style table of contents for the rest of the folder.

 

We’re giving away our wedding folder cover sheet template! Click the button below  to download it now.

 

Download Our Wedding Folder Cover Sheet Template

 

  • Timeline:Weddings are complex events with a million parts that need to be curated. Right after your cover sheet, your floral wedding folder needs to include a timeline of every important event leading up to and on the day of the event. Do you need to do a mockup for the client at your final consultation? Do special flowers need to be ordered in advance? Are you setting up for the ceremony before the break of dawn? Include all of those details in the timeline to keep yourself on track.

 

  • Inquiry and Consultation Forms: You’ll want to have all the information the client’s given you easily accessible towards the front of the folder so you can easily reference it and update it as needed.

 

  • Consultation Notes:When you met with the client, did they add anything that wasn’t covered in one of your forms? Maybe they’re splitting the cost with their parents or have a mother-in-law whom they would prefer to keep out of the wedding details for as long as possible. Whatever the case may be, you’ll want a designated place to keep track of it all.

 

  • Contract and Receipts: Your contract is one of the most important pieces of your floral wedding folder. It’s not only the thing that will protect you from any crazy lawsuit from a bridezilla who didn’t like the exact shade of peonies that were ordered, but it is what outlines the terms the client has to meet to work with you. Keeping this important document in your wedding folder, along with a copy of the client’s receipts, is critical to making sure that you have it easily accessible.

 

Note: As a safety measure, you should make sure to leave out any sensitive payment info and keep it in a secure place. Stripe, or other PCI compliant tools, are great for keeping cards on file securely so you don’t leave yourself or your clients vulnerable. In some states, it’s illegal to record a card number on a digital device.

 

  • The Proposal: Your client will likely make a dozen changes from the time of their initial consultation to final so keeping track of every version within your wedding folder is critical. Depending on the verbiage of your contract, including a copy with their initial/signature to serve as an addendum to the initial contract is also a good idea.

 

  • Associated Vendors:Having a list of other vendors you’re working can be incredibly helpful in preparing for the event. With the list of vendors, you’ll want to have contacts and any important files they may provide. For example, if you’re dropping of personal flowers at the ceremony site and then setting up the reception at a different venue, you may need to reach someone at either venue for specific delivery instructions that the client may be unable to provide.

 

  • Floral Recipe Sheet:Whether you count your stems while creating a proposal for the most accurate cost out or start with a price and work backwards to create a design that works for you, you’ll want to have all of your recipes easily accessible within your wedding folder. This way, when your client says “Let’s make the centerpiece bigger and add a second accent flower,” you’ll be able to make that adjustment quickly. It also makes it easier to assign recipes to each of your team members. You’ll also want your recipe sheet to include any inspiration images from your proposal to make sure your designers match what was promised to the client.

 

  • Shopping List: Once you’ve created your final recipes, you’ll want to be sure to have a clean shopping list that you’ll send to your wholesaler or personally pick up at your local grower. When your order arrives, you’ll be able to use this shopping list to check that the order is complete and begin processing your flowers.

 

  • Rental Pull List: If your client is renting any of your items, you’ll want to keep a separate pull list so you can make sure you get all of the right items pulled from your shelves and returned in proper order.

 

If you’ve gone the digital route with all your documents, make a template folder titled “Wedding Folder” on your desktop with subfolders for each of the things above. Every time you have a new event, just duplicate the template folder and start adding in all the details. And, of course, if you use Curate (or another wedding floral software), you can find all of these things simply by clicking into the event file and printing all the documents for the hard copy of your floral wedding folder.

 

Ready to start organizing your wedding folders better?

 

Download Our Wedding Folder Cover Sheet Template

 


 

Ryan O’Neil founded Curate when his wonderfully-creative wife, Rachael, was consistently spending all hours of the night managing her events with all of her floral wedding folders thrown across the kitchen table and hacked together Excel sheets. Curate has since grown into a full platform with various products to help florists create beautiful proposals, manage costs, track expenses, order from their wholesalers, and stop overbooking rental items.

 

Marketing to Get Clients

 

In this episode of A Minute With Mayesh we discuss how to use marketing efforts to bring in new clients. Check out the full video, and find other great content from past episodes here!

 


 

 

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