Author Archive

Two Reasons Why you Should Stop Asking: “How much would you charge for this?”

 

Today we’re excited to have Curate’s Ryan O’Neil on the blog discussing a somewhat taboo topic in the industry: pricing!

 


 

If you’re on any florist forum, you’ve seen the post. It’s a gorgeous photo that some client has pulled from the underbelly of Pinterest along with a quick question,”How much would you charge for this?” If you’ve ever asked this question, there’s a high chance that the answers to the post hurt your business more than it helped. It’s time to stop asking, “How much would you charge for this?”

 

I get it. In our consults, we speak to florists every day who see arrangements and know exactly what they should cost. At the same time, occasionally they come up against a particular arrangement that’s a bit outside of their wheelhouse, and they have a bride who wants her proposal NOW, creating the need to ask other florists, “how much would you charge for this?” Even though I understand it, here are two reasons why you should stop asking it:

 

1. Your pricing should be based upon the item

 

Any time that you are quoting an item, you are always basing it off of the fact that you should be making adequate profit off of the supplies and the labor going into it. More flowers = more money. More expensive flowers = more expensive item. You’re going to want to “stem count” the item and determine how many of each type of stem you’ll want to add.

In years past, it’s been much more difficult to do these calculations since they had to be done manual. Luckily, technology has made this easier through tools like Curate.

 

2. Every florist has a different markup

 

It’s pretty simple. Everybody is different. Our experience of talking to thousands of florists has led us to believe that there is no industry standard markup on floral work. It seems like the easy route is to find out what others are doing but the reality is that their profit margins and needs are likely so much different than what yours are.

On one particular post, I saw a florist ask for help pricing an arrangement, and someone from a completely different country gave the price they’d charge — In their own currency without even mentioning it. The USD to AUD conversion rate is 1.25, so that poster was getting information that was over 25% incorrect in the simple currency value.

What one florist in South America would charge for an arrangement will not be profitable for a florist in the U.S. because the markups they use are going to be very different, as will the cost they’re being charged by their wholesaler. To ask “What would you charge?” is to neglect a very foundational part of florist business practices which says you should do what is most profitable for your business.

 

Need help figuring out what your custom floral markup should be? Check out our markup calculator.

 

Download The Free Markup Calculator

 

 

So how should you approach the situation?

 

There are some arrangements you see and can easily identify a price point for. Undoubtedly though, there will be a time when you come across an image from a Pinterest bride that has you stumped on what to charge. Rather than asking a florist friend what they would charge, ask them how they would go about calculating a price for the arrangement. Maybe they know that a extravagantly large floral arch over a mansion entryway will take three experienced helpers more than two hours to set up and you’ll need to factor in that additional labor. They could simply tell you to charge $2,000 for the installation because you asked for pricing help. Instead, they can tell you what to factor in. And if you don’t have experienced helpers, you’ll know to factor in a little bit more on the labor side for an extra set of hands or extra hours spent on the arrangement to make the arrangement more profitable, rather than charging $2,000 and barely breaking even or, worse, losing money on the arrangement.

Similarly, if you’re ever asked how you would price an arrangement, turn the conversation around to how you would calculate the price for the arrangement. What’s the base price you’re getting from your wholesaler? What’s your floral markup? Your hardgood markup? Your labor markup? Are you building labor costs into the arrangement or tacking it on at the end of your proposal? There are many parts to consider when pricing an arrangement that you should break down when explaining how you came to your suggested price.

 

This is why Curate was created in the first place. Stem counting is an incredible headache, especially with more complex creations showing up on Pinterest. If you’re wondering whether a software could help, we’d certainly love to do a personalized consultation to hear about your business and see if we can help. Let’s chat.

 

 

Learn More

 

 

Mayesh Design Star Charleston Workshop Recap

 

The year is flying by, and although we have only one workshop left in our 2018 Mayesh Design Star workshop series, we still have our past three workshops to recap!

 

First up: CHARLESTON

 

Our May Charleston workshop was just featured on Botanical Brouhaha, but there are so many more beautiful photos we just had to share.

The workshop was held at The Cedar Room, a dreamy venue located in Charleston’s historic Cigar Factory. With white washed brick walls, tall windows and as much natural light as you could possibly hope for, this venue was more than perfect for our spring inspired workshop.

 


 

DAY ONE

 

As with our Miami workshop, we started the workshop Monday evening with a networking event. The students enjoyed appetizers and wine while meeting one another and watching presentations from Ryan O’Neil of Curate & Jodi Duncan for Design Master. Following their educational presentations, Kaylee discussed the important role mood boards play in her design process, and had each student create their own as a way to help define their style. Everyone – the Mayesh team included! – then went around and wrote a descriptive word next to each mood board, leaving each student with a long list of words to help articulate their style in five words. This exercise was a great way to get the students thinking about their unique styles and coming into day two with more intention.

 

 

 


 

DAY TWO

 

Day two was all about design. Kaylee and her assistant Jamie led the students in a group installation activity. When the students arrived, the ceremony was set up with a simple, bare arch and two large urn arrangements to show one option for a ceremony set up. Then, as a class they created the second ceremony option: a lush floral arch and aisleway installation using spirea, garden roses and peonies.

Following the installation, Kaylee demonstrated how she creates her signature bridal bouquets. The students then designed their own bouquets, finished off with gorgeous silk ribbon from Adorn Company and photographed with local model Hilary Rose.

 

 

Workshop Credits:

 

Taught by Kaylee Young of Flourish by Kay
Photography: Nicole Clarey Photography
Venue: The Cedar Room
Rentals: Ooh! Events
Ribbon: Adorn
Model: Hilary Rose
Dress: Fabulous Frocks Bridal
HMUA: Pampered & Pretty

 

Workshop Product Sponsors:

 

 


 

To learn more and reserve your spot in our LAST workshop of the year in Salt Lake City, click here!

 

Interview with Good Seed Floral

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

 

This week Good Seed Floral took over our Instagram feed & flooded it with beautiful images, but what really stuck out was their passion that shone through, not only for flowers but also for inspiring others by keeping it real and sharing their experiences — the good & the bad! Keep reading to learn even more about these two friends turned business partners and how Good Seed Floral came to be!

 


 

So tell us the story of Good Seed Floral… when & how did you both end up in the floral industry?

We feel like our story is so typical in the wedding floral industry! Basically we fell into it very organically- a lot of our close friends were getting married in 2012 (the year we graduated from college) and none of us had money for gifts/floral design so we ended up arranging the flowers for them! At first it was fun, but by the end of the summer we were obsessed and when one of the weddings was featured in Eugene Wedding Magazine we knew we had to go for it. Both of us have a background in art and finding a way to express that felt very natural.

 

What are your individual design styles, and how have you meshed them together to create the Good Seed aesthetic?

We are both drawn towards a garden, textural, wild/romantic style of design. And although our styles have both grown a lot in the past 6 years, we have stayed consistent with what we love. I would say Taylor brings more of the wild, textural side of our brand and I (Joanna) bring the more airy, romantic side. Together this is the epitome of our creative style!

 

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

 

Tell us what it’s like to work together! What are some of the challenges you face having a business partner in a creative industry, as well as your favorite parts about it?

Taylor and I were friends before the business started and we have found it to be the biggest blessing to own a business together! It’s fun to celebrate victories with someone we truly care about- beyond the business and see how it’s impacting our families + futures together. It’s amazing to know that even if Good Seed went away, we would still have that. Being 100% honest and transparent is the biggest thing we have to remember. It’s easy to let little things build up and create bitterness, but as soon as we’re honest (over a bottle of tequila most of the time haha) everything is better. It’s honestly a lot like a marriage in that way! We also have to make sure we make time to just be “friends” because it’s so easy to let our business always come first.

 

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

 

Your Portland-based studio also takes weddings in Austin, TX. How did that come about, and what is it like offering your services in two different states?

So we started doing weddings in both Austin and Portland about two years ago- one half of Good Seed (Josie) moved down there after her husband got a job and started networking + marketing to brides. We don’t take as many weddings down there, but since the seasons are so different it’s great to be able to get more November- April weddings if we want! Basically Josie lives down there for half of the year, then she and her husband come up to Oregon for the summer wedding season here! We are thankful to have friends in Austin who let us use their studio. It’s been so fun to do weddings in both places and experience the different cultures of each area!

 

We all know being in the wedding industry isn’t easy, but there’s always that something for each of us that keeps us in. What keeps you going and motived to live that flower hustlin’ life every day?

Ah! So many things! I feel like we have to have these things at the front of our business in order to keep our love for what we do alive for sure. First, our couples! Investing in our couple’s stories and their love for each other + being able to be a part of that is so so amazing. We are both so passionate about marriage and the beautiful picture of commitment that it is. There’s nothing better than getting to reflect that in our designs. Second, collaborating with other creatives! This feeds our souls and is one of the best parts of the industry in our opinion. Community is super important to us! The third thing that keeps us going is the ability to pass on our love of floral design + the confidence to express oneself creatively. Teaching is a recent passion, but it’s amazing to see our students thrive and gain confidence.

 

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

 

Let’s talk tools – favorite florist tool, and favorite app you use in your business, be it social media or business organization? Instagram counts (ha!) but if there’s anything else you’re using we’d love to hear about it!

Our favorite florist tool that we discovered recently is a rose stripper that saves us SO much time!! Stripping roses is pretty much the worst so when we discovered this we were so excited. It’s called the Hinged Stem Stripper and I know you can get them online! Another favorite are these clippers we get on Amazon called Sakagen Hand Creation Flower Scissors. They are the cutest and soooooo sharp. For business organization, we literally could not do anything without Honeybook. It SAVED us this year!

 

You recently hosted the first Floral Gathering which we posted about, and I absolutely love the collaborative nature of the industry right now… it wasn’t always that way! Can you speak to the floral community in Portland, and why you decided to host that event?

Yes!! The Portland flower community is seriously the best. We are each other’s biggest cheerleaders. I know when we’re having a rough day + say something about it we will have so much advice/encouragement/love pouring in. And from people who get it, which means so much more. Having that from the people around us who are supposed to be our “competition” is incredible. We wanted to reflect that with a day of creativity and design (and good food!). Together with Brier and Ivy we got to bring together so many amazing florists and create just for ourselves. And then we got to relax and enjoy it. It was the most beautiful, refreshing day.

 

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

 

Alright, you knew it was coming! Favorite flowers?

HA! The hardest question. It’s always rotating depending on what’s inspiring us, but right now it’s spring flowers like Spirea, foxglove, iris and Japanese anemone. They are so lush and romantic, but also fun and textural which is our jam!

 

What trends are you seeing start to emerge in the world of floral design right now? And are you a fan of said trends?

Right now, we’re seeing a lot of color trends for next year- mainly rust reds and copper. Which we LOVE! We had a good amount of weddings in the last year or two with neutrals and burgundy and while we love those colors, it’s nice to push ourselves creatively with different palettes. Working with flowers is a lot like painting to us.

 

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

 

What is one piece of advice you’d go back and tell yourselves during your first year as floral designers?

“Take yourselves seriously!” I think we struggled with feeling confident and like we were “real” florists in the beginning because we were self-taught. We looked around and felt like everyone else had it together but us. And while we had a lot to learn, we’ve realized that no one has it all together! We are all on a journey and giving yourself credit, even in the beginning, for being an artist and honoring that is so important in the creative industry. You have something that no one else has! Be open and humble, but have confidence in yourself + know your worth.

 

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

Good Seed Floral Design Mayesh Takeover

 

Thank you so much for having us on your blog!! We are honored to have this opportunity.

 

www.goodseedfloral.co

 

@goodseedfloral

 

hello@goodseedfloral.co

 

 

Beyond the ‘Gram: Collabs are Fab

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

The much anticipated part three of Shelley Ander’s blog series is finally here! If you haven’t read her two previous posts, make sure you catch up first!

 


 

A long time ago, in a floral galaxy far, far away… there was battle raging on. It was US and THEM… THE COMPETITION. If you owned a florist or floral design company, any other florist around was your adversary. If you spied them at the floral market you nodded, smiled your polite hellos, threw shade, coveted their flower cart and kept on moving. You envied their progress and knowingly applauded their downfall. You may have even pulled a Katy Perry and tried to lure their employees away. No? Oh wait. Was that just me?

 

Oh, who are you kidding Miss Polly Perfect, we’ve all been on that dark side and it ain’t good… In the old days, you stayed on your side of the fence and they stayed on theirs. That was the American Way! Old school florists, you know who you are and what I am talking about.

 

I jest, but it was kinda true. Now don’t get me wrong, you had your florist friends and you may have shared designers, but they were in other cities. The further away from your zip code the better your friendship, and if they were in another state you were practically besties! We were a protective lot back then. There was more than enough business to go around, yet we did not like sharing it very much.

 

All of that is changing. And it has never been more apparent than right now. The newer generation of floral designers (female in particular) have reached an almost zen-like community of inclusion and sisterhood. I see this every day here at Mayesh. Where people barely spoke or acknowledged each other, they are chatting and discussing each others’ carts, the events they are working on and more importantly they are working together. Collaborating.

 

In today’s environment there is much more of a willingness to work together. A new collaborative spirit amongst our designers, new and old. I see more and more of them at our locations chatting, sharing notes and networking than in the past. There is more of a sense of camaraderie. The US is the florist, the THEM the consumer. We are all in this thing together. With the world shrinking due to social media exposure and constant internet access, it is changing the face of the floral landscape for everyone. There is even more competition than ever before, yet there is more collaboration than ever before.

 

A few years back I owned a flower shop. Actually, I have owned two. The first in Dallas, TX in my early 30’s during those floral days of yore. My second was a shop located in the Arts District of Downtown Long Beach. A grungy, bohemian landscape full of millenials, coffee shops and a bootstrap spirit where I had a dream of opening a eco-friendly shop that carried organic or locally grown flowers, upcycled and repurposed vases, and art. My landlord and amazing Oklahomian named Roni Skeen took a chance on me and Primal Flower was born.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram: The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

After practically starving the first year, things started falling into place for my business. People loved my concept and it was really taking a hold in Long Beach. It was early into my second year when I had a lovely email exchange with the very popular, Southern California floral designer and Long Beach native, Megan Grey from Honey and Poppies. One of the originals in the early garden revival movement and exquisitely talented.

 

 

Gorgeous work from Megan Grey | Photography: This Modern Romance

 

I had apparently sent an acquaintance of hers flowers. The young lady’s husband had ordered them from me after finding me online. Megan had seen the flowers and was blown away by them and wanted to know where they had come from. I was so very flattered; of course I knew who she was and was a fan. At the time there were no retail shops in Long Beach doing quite the throwback lush garden look that I was getting known for. Remember that magazine article about Saipua? I had really loved that she had brought that look back and I was fully on board bringing it to my new community in Long Beach. What really impressed me was Megan’s kindness and willingness to reach out to me, someone who could be looked at as her new competitor in town. Well if you could call me that… let’s just say that Megan Gray is in a league of her own. Okay, I say I was impressed… more like shocked.

 

Beyond the 'Gram: The Flower Industry IRL

The design Megan saw & loved from back in my Primal Flower days!

 

But it was one of the first signs of many that I would start to see with this newer generation of florists that I had not really experienced as much with my generation of florists. Not being threatened by each other and a willingness to collaborate and work together. She would send weddings my way when she was not available and I was very appreciative.

 

Collaboration is not necessarily new. Flower shops and florists have for years networked and worked together. I have many times freelanced and helped my flower friends over the years with their weddings and events. I have gone back and worked with former employers and helped them from time to time when the needed an extra hand. But in general, most shops kind of kept a respectful and not always friendly but definitely competitive distance from each other.

 

So what gives now? Why the change?

 

Florists are finding that they need each other as sounding boards and mentors. There is a huge community of online floral chat groups on Facebook alone. You can get support and questions answered from your peers. Things that you may have needed help with but were too embarrassed to ask before. Or maybe you are just super stoked and proud of something you just created and want to share it with your peers. It’s great getting honest feedback.

 

Holly Chapple started Chapel Designers, “an international collective of wedding and event floral designers. The organization not only educates, supports, and mentors creatives, but also encourages the individual designer to be his or her most authentic self.“ And there are great florists blogs out now like Flirty Fleurs and Debra Prinzing who writes a blog and published a book about the slow flower movement.

 

Forming strong alliances with your contemporaries makes smart business sense, especially in this type of business which is heavily dependent on artistic design. Finding a few good florist friends whose work you value and trust to help you out in a pinch during an illness or unexpected family emergency or god forbid an unforeseen tragedy is worth its weight in gold.

 

Another added benefit is continuing education. We are all in a constant state of learning and this strange little business we have all found ourselves often times floundering in has not given us any floral training. Some of us have worked in shops for many years. Some of us have started our own businesses from scratch and are very self taught. Some have gone through the entire AIFD process and gotten certified. But unless you work with other designers of many different degrees of experience and skill level you really are limiting yourself.

 

A new trend we have seen explode in the past couple of years are individual mentoring sessions and workshops. Mayesh has its own Design Star and does a traveling workshop series that promotes continuing education as well as a video series. Many florist now do workshops, and while not necessarily a new thing, the way they are being done and promoted is new. In the past you just showed up at your local flower shop and took a class, and maybe refreshments were served.

 

Our Miami Mayesh Design Star workshop, led Kaylee Young of Flourish by Kay 

 

Now it is an event with sponsors and floral bling. You could walk away with a swag bag of goodies from many different vendors. One-on-one mentoring is relatively new as well. I visited with the wildly popular Rachael Lunghi from Siren Floral Co. during one of her workshops. She is based here in San Diego and hosts many workshops. She also has many florists who fly from all over the country to visit with her to learn her special mojo during paid mentorships. Her classes are always full of hip women: young and mature, newbies and OG’s who want to learn from this magical, ethereal young lady.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

In the past you could barely get your fellow floral designers, manager, head designer or contemporaries to teach you anything so great was the fear that they would steal something from you… your talent or your clients. Not so much anymore.

 

I recently interviewed the enormously talented and very lovely Carla Kayes owner of Carla Kayes Floral Design in Temecula about the recent trend with the newer generation of florists’ more collaborative spirit: “I feel like I have gained so much by helping somebody else because everybody does something different, and they possibly do something more successfully or more efficiently than what you do.” She also adds that “ten years ago it was a different story, things were ugly. Now people work together and it makes everyone better, we all get better when we share information and knowledge.” Carla should know, she has had one of the most successful rebranding campaigns of recent memory and a lot of it had to do with her willingness to learn from and work with her newer contemporaries.

 

 

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

Beyond the 'Gram The Flower Industry IRL

 

 

This also helps create a united front when it comes to pricing strategies, something florists have always struggled with. If everyone is on the same page and and keeps pricing transparent and open, it helps with consumers who are price shopping. I have heard from several of my clients who have told me that because of the open, collaborative nature of their relationships with other wedding florists and shops that when they are price shopped, they all can discuss it… “oh yeah, that bride hit me up too.” At least they can feel confident that they are being chosen for their work and not just because the were the cheapest.

 

With the explosion of one-on-one mentorships, workshops and webinars there are more and more ways to learn and work as a florist these days. Don’t be afraid to reach out to a florist you admire and ask about networking or freelancing for them.

 

 


 

 

A few tips that are helpful and will give you major cred in the business::

 

 

  • Always be respectful of their work. Absolutely ask permission to photograph any work that you are doing for them. It is their intellectual property.

 

  • Always tag them and request permission to use any photos of said work on social media.

 

  • Do not post their work as your own… yes it has been done countless times. (I have been a victim of this)

 

  • Respect their neighborhood, find your own area or zip code to work in that doesn’t cause a conflict of interest. For example don’t host a workshop or event a street over from your friend’s flower shop.

 

  • Have integrity! Never try to steal a client out from under your florist friend.

 

  • Be inclusive. When holding events, or group get togethers always try to invite or include flower friends in your network. The floral world is a small world and news travels fast! #nofrenemies

 

  • Don’t steal staff from another flower friend. Did Katy Perry and Tay Tay not teach us anything? Flower feuds are not any prettier.

 

  • Make sure you are there to work and not just there to get a free “workshop” out of your chosen florist. It’s okay to fangirl, but have integrity here too. Keep the million questions and digging into vendor secrets to yourself. People have worked hard to get where they are and you baby florist, need to learn how earn your stripes too. You will be much more respected and asked back in the future. They will see right through your shenanigans. Sign a non-compete in these instances.

 

  • Above all, do unto others as you would have done to you.

 

 

#beyondthegram , Beyond the 'Gram , Shelley Anders

 

Mayesh Design Star: How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

 

In this month’s Mayesh Design Star video, Kaylee Young teaches you how she creates a floating, cloud-like baby’s breath installation for a whimsical wedding reception.

 


 

Featured flowers: baby’s breath

Supplies: Clippers, wire cutters, scissors, fishing line, Oasis wire netting (chicken wire), Oasis caged bricks, Oasis non-caged bricks, Lomey dishes

 

Host: Kaylee Young, Flourish by Kay
Videographer: Logan Martin, Talewind Visuals
Photographer: Chantel Marie

 

 


 

 

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star How to Make a Floating Installation

Mayesh Design Star

 

Mayesh Cooler Picks: July

 

Need a little color inspiration? Look no further than these colorful, summery color palettes featuring some of our gorgeous luxe wholesale flowers!

 


 

 

APRICOT

 

Mayesh Cooler Picks July

top | double coral tulip, Allyson garden rose, apricot parrot tulip
middle | coral double hollyhock, peach ball dahlia, Augusta Luise garden rose
bottom | Juliet garden rose, Blushing Parasol garden spray rose, peach ranunculus

 

 

BLUSH

 

Mayesh Cooler Picks July

top | Inferno astilbe, blush astrantia, blush cosmos
middle | white agapanthus, Japanese bleached fern, white lace cap hybrid
bottom | Blushing Bride protea, blush cottage yarrow, blush honeycomb dahlias

 

 

LILAC

 

Mayesh Cooler Picks July

top | lavender gomphrena, double flowering oregano, purple foxglove
middle | mauve hellebores, double variegated cosmos, hops oregano
bottom | lavender dahlias, purple physostegia, Mon Cheri garden spray rose

 

 

SUMMER BERRY

 

top | magenta peonies, Nobbio Blackheart carnations, hot pink double tulips
middle | Burgundy scabiosa, burgundy ball dahlias, burgundy anemones
bottom | fuchsia lace garden spray rose, Hypnosis carnations, antique coral ball dahlia

 

The Floral Gathering

Floral Gathering Portland

 

We’re smack dab in the middle of wedding season, and I’m going to go out on a limb and say that the majority of you are a little bit tired and a lotta bit in need of a mental reset! Well, the ladies of Good Seed Floral  and Brier + Ivy in Portland, OR are fully aware of the struggle, and they decided to do something about it! In our ever evolving industry, where collaboration and community between floral designers is flourishing, they decided to start The Floral Gathering, an opportunity for designers to come together to play with flowers and connect with one another over a meal. Our very own Jocelyn Kehrle attended the first Floral Gathering last night… here’s what she had to say!

 


 

I had the opportunity to attend the first Floral Gathering in Portland tonight! It’s all about bringing our floral community together and making beautiful floral arrangements. Amy from Brier + Ivy and Joanna and Taylor from Good Seed Floral hosted the event. It was beautiful and intimate and we created a whole lot of beautiful things! Foraged Blooms attended as well as BLUE Floral Company, For the Love of Floral, Hart Floral, Vanessa Schmidt Co. and Lou + You Florals. It was an evening filled with gorgeous blooms, beautiful people and friends!

 

 

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

Floral Gathering Portland

 

We absolutely love this idea, and are so inspired by the collaborative nature of the floral industry right now. If your floral community does something similar, let us know! We’d love to share the different ways our customers are connecting, working together, or just dealing with the craziness that comes with being a florist. Cheers to you!

 

Mayesh Design Star Miami Workshop Recap

 

As we gear up for our third workshop of the year in Seattle, we’re taking a look back on our first workshop this past January in Miami! Now that it has officially been published on Botanical Brouhaha, we’re excited to share some more of the beautiful photos and video to give you a look into what our Curate & Create Workshop Tour with Kaylee Young really looks like.

Our Miami workshop was held at 255 Studio, a photography studio in the vibrant Wynwood Arts District that provided the perfect blank canvas for Kaylee to work with.

 


 

VIDEO

 

DAY ONE

 

The workshop kicked off with an evening networking event. Two of our product sponsors (Hosa & Alexandra Farms) stopped by to talk about their products while the students ate delicious appetizers from Food Guy Catering. Then Kaylee led the class in a mood boarding activity in an effort to help the students define their own, unique design styles and come into the next day with intention.

 

 


 

DAY TWO

 

The second day of the workshop focused on design. Kaylee walked the students through her entire process from order curation to design. The students were then given the opportunity to create their own centerpieces using the most amazing product from our sponsors.

The last piece of the workshop was a group installation, led by Kaylee and her design assistant, Jamie Heusser. Together they created a chuppah and aisleway installation with a variety of foliages and garden roses.

 

 

 

Workshop Credits:

 

Taught by Kaylee Young of Flourish by Kay
Photography: Nicole Clarey Photography
Videography: Talewind Visuals
Venue: 255 Miami Studio
Rentals: Elements & AccentsLavish Event Rentals
Catering: Food Guy Catering

 

Workshop Product Sponsors:

 

 


 

To learn more about our workshops and reserve your spot in one of the remaining three (Seattle, Santa Barbara or Salt Lake City), click here!

 

Mayesh Cooler Picks: June

Mayesh Cooler Picks

 

From bright, juicy colors to softer pastels, summer flowers can be done either way! Check out some of our gorgeous wholesale flowers in both palettes in these June Mayesh Cooler Picks!

 


 

 

CRANBERRY

 

Mayesh Cooler Picks

top | Coral Charm peonies, Shimmer roses, coral zinnias
middle | antique red hydrangea, Madam Butterfly garden spray rose, red foxglove
bottom | Princess Kishi garden rose, gold amaranthus, Houdini Garden Rose

 

 

PEACHY BLUSH

 

Mayesh Cooler Picks

top | Mr. Ed peonies, peach eremurus, inferno astilbe
middle | Caramel Antike garden rose, Cafe au Lait Dahlia, Citrine Gem garden spray rose
bottom | blush hellebores, Garden Treasure peony, Hanoi ranunculus

 

#MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge Winners

 

We loved all the #MayeshFloralMeme’s you guys submitted, and had such a hard time choosing our favorites! We selected three winners from each entry period, from memes that made us laugh out loud to clever, inspirational ones!

 

Winners, please use our Contact Us page to send us your name, address, and Mayesh rep by Tuesday, July 3rd so we can send you your prize!

 


 

WEEK ONE

 

@kdoersam1

#MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge

 

@loricoleevents

#MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge

 

@foxtailandwillow

#MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge

 

WEEK TWO

 

@blooms_rockbrook

#MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge #MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge

 

@pistilnbloom

#MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge

 

#MayeshFloralMeme Instagram Challenge

 

@florianfloral

#MayeshFloralMeme instagram challenge

 

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